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I just installed a deatschwerks fuel pump on my stock RSX. After the install is now will not rev at all idle has dropped from 1200 to around 500. It has not kicked any codes after about 1 hour of it trying to run. Any help would be great.
 

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Past Driver’s Ed
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I’m successfully using a DW fuel pump on my current build. What brand name of pump you used won’t be the issue. For others to help you we need more information, like the new pump’s model number, did you mess with the OEM fuel pressure regulator, or did you make any modifications to the pump cage.
 

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I know the brand doesn't matter, but what if you put in one that is too big, or does the regulator do it's thing no matter how big?
 

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Past Driver’s Ed
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The OEM fuel pressure regulator should be able to manage a pump with more flow. The pump size usually does not create the issue, it's the modifications made to pump cage or the pump connections that create the headaches. What pump model did you install? Take the DW65c, if I remember correctly it's a direct fit and has enough flow to handle most engine builds. The only reason why I updated my OEM fuel pump was when I modified to a return fuel system, running on E85 fuel with 1000cc fuel injectors.
 

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I'm in the process of returning mine to a more normal set up as the guy who did my E85 set up put holes in everything and didn't run the return back to the basket. I've been told to keep the basket whole and run the return back into the basket so it get's more fuel. As it was, I was getting fuel starvation at 1/4 tank or more.
 

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Past Driver’s Ed
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You are correct, the last thing you want to do is put holes in the fuel pump cage. If you need more details how to install a return fuel system correctly just let me know.
 

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You are correct, the last thing you want to do is put holes in the fuel pump cage. If you need more details how to install a return fuel system correctly just let me know.
DC5Sandbag would you be able to direct me to the info on the CORRECT way to run a fuel return? Most the info I have read causes the fuel starvation below a 1/3 tank of fuel. Thanks for any help/info
 

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Past Driver’s Ed
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Although there are already a couple postings on this forum on how to install a return fuel system, it seems that some find a few steps a bit confusing. Give me this week to review the existing posts, and I will add a few written details plus some photographs. My current setup is at least 4-5 years old and it supports a supercharged engine running on E85. I've had zero issues with low tank levels or any corrosion reactions between the fuel hardware and E85. I will provide an update by the end of this Saturday.
 

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Although there are already a couple postings on this forum on how to install a return fuel system, it seems that some find a few steps a bit confusing. Give me this week to review the existing posts, and I will add a few written details plus some photographs. My current setup is at least 4-5 years old and it supports a supercharged engine running on E85. I've had zero issues with low tank levels or any corrosion reactions between the fuel hardware and E85. I will provide an update by the end of this Saturday.
Okay thanks alot. I'm pretty solid on just about everything, but just for example and I know it's old but on typespazs diy there is talk at the end of the thread of the fuel starvation issue under a 1/3 tank and pressure issues from the return jet I believe it is, being too small and raising pressures or something like that. So it seemed like extra steps were needed to not have the fuel starvation problem. I just wanted to clear up those two issues, and everything else I think I can handle. I just didn't want to do the install to run into fuel starvation or pressure issues. I've also read contradicting info about removing the original fpr. I just wanted to get a setup (mainly the fuel hanger/cage modifications) from someone such as yourself that has been tested and working and you have a blower which is the route I'm going so that's a plus 👍 thanks again for looking over the info.
 

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Past Driver’s Ed
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I'm in the process of returning mine to a more normal set up as the guy who did my E85 set up put holes in everything and didn't run the return back to the basket. I've been told to keep the basket whole and run the return back into the basket so it get's more fuel. As it was, I was getting fuel starvation at 1/4 tank or more.
It was a busy past week for me, but I’m trying to follow through with my info on a return fuel system. I see that today we have quite a few DIY videos on how to install a return fuel system on a RSX. Steps that I feel need a little more clarification are modifications to the fuel pump cage, OEM fuel pressure regulator, and the fuel return jet.
The pump cage pays a critical role in the fuel system. The purpose of the cage is to ensure that the fuel pump pickup stays submerged in fuel during sharp turns and bumps. So if you install a new fuel pump feed line, you need take time to layout the area of the cage that needs to be removed so that the fuel line has a straight pass to the pump’s discharge port. You only want to remove just enough material to allow enough clearance for the fuel line to pass through cage wall. Don’t hack out a big slot like most videos show. I actually drilled a hole for mine. Also, do not drill any extra holes in the cage thinking that they will allow more fuel to the pump. The extra holes will have just the opposite effect.
The OEM fuel pressure regulator becomes obsolete and needs to be removed when utilizing a return fuel line system. The fuel cap OEM fuel discharge port will now be converted into the fuel return line port which you will connect a new hose from that port directly to the fuel return jet. You will also need to plug the old fuel return port that went from the fuel cap to the OEM fuel pressure regulator.
The return fuel jet port is located towards the bottom of the pump cage, between the OEM fuel pressure regulator and the fuel pump. The purpose of the return jet is to ensure that there is a supply of fuel at ambient temperature to the pump cage. Using a fuel pump with increase flow/pressure, the return jet’s orifice diameter is too small and will restrict the flow of the fuel returning into the fuel tank. The orifice size needs to be increase to 0.125 inch diameter minimum. Use a sharp drill and take care not to damage the jet. If you elect not to perform this step, you may have issues adjusting the pressure low enough at the external fuel pressure regulator.
The rest of the modification details are covered petty well in the different DIY videos. Make sure that the hose material used inside the fuel tank is rated “fuel submergible”. Use hose clamps at all connections. I’m attaching a hardware list plus some photos on how I routed the fuel lines. You want to protect the fuel lines from heat and road debris damaged. Support fuel lines with hangers about every 10 inches. The fuel line size that I used supports without issues 1000cc injectors, pumping E85 fuel.












 

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Thanks alot man, that's exactly the info I've been looking for. Thanks for taking the time to write all that out. Very good info, and easy to understand 👍
 

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Past Driver’s Ed
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I'm in the process of returning mine to a more normal set up as the guy who did my E85 set up put holes in everything and didn't run the return back to the basket. I've been told to keep the basket whole and run the return back into the basket so it get's more fuel. As it was, I was getting fuel starvation at 1/4 tank or more.
Some additional information related to using E85 fuel that might help you
  1. Will E85 damage the fuel tank level sensor? No issues after 5 yrs of use.
  2. Will E85 in the tank turn bad if I store the car for six months? E85 does attract water (hygroscopic). Before storing your car, add fuel stabilizer made for E85 fuel to the fuel tank. Fill the tank to the very top, minimizing the air volume trapped in the tank. If you have a fuel return system, cycle your fuel pump long enough to ensure the fuel/stabilizer blend reaches your fuel injectors. If you don’t have a fuel return system, drive your car for a few miles and then park it.
 

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Some additional information related to using E85 fuel that might help you
  1. Will E85 damage the fuel tank level sensor? No issues after 5 yrs of use.
  2. Will E85 in the tank turn bad if I store the car for six months? E85 does attract water (hygroscopic). Before storing your car, add fuel stabilizer made for E85 fuel to the fuel tank. Fill the tank to the very top, minimizing the air volume trapped in the tank. If you have a fuel return system, cycle your fuel pump long enough to ensure the fuel/stabilizer blend reaches your fuel injectors. If you don’t have a fuel return system, drive your car for a few miles and then park it.
I have a quick irrelevant question cause I see your running a blower. What did you do with your pcv valve? I can't seem to find a straight answer for what people do with the pcv for supercharged applications. I'm running the rotrex mind you, and thanks for your assistance on the fuel setup
 

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Past Driver’s Ed
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I have a quick irrelevant question cause I see your running a blower. What did you do with your pcv valve? I can't seem to find a straight answer for what people do with the pcv for supercharged applications. I'm running the rotrex mind you, and thanks for your assistance on the fuel setup
The OEM PCV is still being utilized with the CT Engineering supercharger. If you look close at the engine bay photo the supercharger inlet manifold has two ports located near the air conditioning line. It’s the lower of the two hoses.
 

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The OEM PCV is still being utilized with the CT Engineering supercharger. If you look close at the engine bay photo the supercharger inlet manifold has two ports located near the air conditioning line. It’s the lower of the two hoses.
Do you think I would be okay running the OEM pcv to the intake manifold running the rotrex? Or should I drill out the pcv and vent to atmosphere? I'm stuck. And are you running a catch can of some sort off the valve cover? Thanks for all the input it is greatly appreciated
 

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Past Driver’s Ed
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Do you think I would be okay running the OEM pcv to the intake manifold running the rotrex? Or should I drill out the pcv and vent to atmosphere? I'm stuck. And are you running a catch can of some sort off the valve cover? Thanks for all the input it is greatly appreciated
My car build style is sleepers. They have slight modifications to the exteriors, but they have a crap load of horsepower. The most important thing is that the engine has to be reliable and respond at least as good or better than when it left the factory. With that said, I feel drilling out the PCV and venting to the atmosphere is taking the easy way out. I would hook the PCV to the intake to help minimize pressure building up in the engine block. Hell even in the old old days racing with V8s, I used to vent the engine blocks by hooking up hoses with check valves to the valve covers and then run the hoses down to header collectors. The exhaust passing through the header collectors would generate the vacuum. I’m not using a catch can. My engine seals and rings are still in good shape after 190k miles and the engine barley consumes any oil. Now if you are blowing oil left and right, then I would install a catch can. I would install the catch can between the PCV port and the intake manifold. I wouldn’t want to induce any more oil contaminated air through the throttle body than I had to.
 

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My car build style is sleepers. They have slight modifications to the exteriors, but they have a crap load of horsepower. The most important thing is that the engine has to be reliable and respond at least as good or better than when it left the factory. With that said, I feel drilling out the PCV and venting to the atmosphere is taking the easy way out. I would hook the PCV to the intake to help minimize pressure building up in the engine block. Hell even in the old old days racing with V8s, I used to vent the engine blocks by hooking up hoses with check valves to the valve covers and then run the hoses down to header collectors. The exhaust passing through the header collectors would generate the vacuum. I’m not using a catch can. My engine seals and rings are still in good shape after 190k miles and the engine barley consumes any oil. Now if you are blowing oil left and right, then I would install a catch can. I would install the catch can between the PCV port and the intake manifold. I wouldn’t want to induce any more oil contaminated air through the throttle body than I had to.
Just to clarify you mean pcv to intake Not drilled out?
 

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I wouldn't drill it out
I just got to looking at your pictures closer are you running the OEM fuel damper? If you are how come? I didn't think you needed it with an external fpr. And I was wondering where your valve cover breather hose is ran to?
 
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