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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I'm new to this forum, and autocross in general. I'm going to try to do my first in July. I was curious about the best things I can do for performance for the money for autocross. I have a base RSX, completely stock right now. I'm not planning on doing anything before the race in July, as I'm sure it won't matter since I need practice, but I was wondering what I should do in the long run.

If you have any suggestions, can you also let me know what recommendations you would have on the order in which to do them?

Thanks so much,
Greg
 

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Driving school. Hands donw the #1 thing that will make you faster. Because when you are first starting out, the biggest thing making you slow is you.


Other then that, The right tires will make more of a difference handling then any other single part.
 

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behind your rearview
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just experience and get as much help as possible, I had a friend of mine, rich (was on these boards) that has a black type-s with less mods than me and he beats me all the time...why because he had experience with an SM civic before... experience, seat time, and help always prevails...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Tires?

Zzyzx said:
Driving school. Hands donw the #1 thing that will make you faster. Because when you are first starting out, the biggest thing making you slow is you.


Other then that, The right tires will make more of a difference handling then any other single part.

So what are some good tires? Also, does rim size matter? Just curious. I figured about the school, though. I've seen it in action, and it does make a difference.

Greg
 

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Tires are limited by what class you can run... But a general rule is Run the smallest wheel you can fit around your rotors/calipers, and run the widest wheel you can fit... Tie that it to the stikiest tire you can.. If you run SCCA events, and run STS or STX, then you are limited to tires with a tread wear of over 140, that basically leaves you with 3 tires, the Falken Azenis Sport, the Kumho MX or the BFG g-Force T/A KD (not the KDW). Other wise you can run "R" compound tires like Hoosier A3S03s, A4S04s, or Kumho Victoracers, Ecsta V700s... Just about any other tire equates to Jerkin yer self around...

Rim size only matters if you are runing stock, other wise run the Smallest + widest+Lightest wheel you can find.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Another question...

Zzyzx said:
Tires are limited by what class you can run... But a general rule is Run the smallest wheel you can fit around your rotors/calipers, and run the widest wheel you can fit... Tie that it to the stikiest tire you can.. If you run SCCA events, and run STS or STX, then you are limited to tires with a tread wear of over 140, that basically leaves you with 3 tires, the Falken Azenis Sport, the Kumho MX or the BFG g-Force T/A KD (not the KDW). Other wise you can run "R" compound tires like Hoosier A3S03s, A4S04s, or Kumho Victoracers, Ecsta V700s... Just about any other tire equates to Jerkin yer self around...

Rim size only matters if you are runing stock, other wise run the Smallest + widest+Lightest wheel you can find.
Where can I go about learning about tires? I've seen people talking about them, but I don't usually follow. And how can you tell if a tire is going to be good for autocross (or in general for that matter)?

Greg
 

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Most High performance street tires will do OK, there are a couple of "street" tires that you can run that have more in common with Race tires then they do with street tires. (Falken Azenis RS, Kumho MX) and then you have your Traditional "R" compound DOT legal tires.

IF you really want to konw alot about tires theres a book out called The racing and High Performance Tire and it will teach you more about tires then you would ever want to konw. other wise, if you want to ask questions about tires and autocross, the SCCA Forums is a good place to start
 

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leishen said:
Where can I go about learning about tires? I've seen people talking about them, but I don't usually follow. And how can you tell if a tire is going to be good for autocross (or in general for that matter)?

Greg
If you touch the tire with your hand and it sticks so much that it takes effort to get it off, it's an autox tire.
 

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Start with brakes (Rotors, pads, brake lines and fluid) and then basic suspension. I love my Mugen Sport Suspension because of its street/race ability. Then do some basic engine stuff (Filter, exhaust). Obviously this is not normaly the secuence people follow. They will start with fast engine but at the track there is no way to put the power to the asphalt. Learn first to drive a good racing line, exit speed, heel and toe, trailbraking and then start your mods :thumbsup:
 

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I wouldn't do anything until you've got several events under your belt. The stock tires suck, but are excellent for helping you learn your car and how to drive it.

I've been to 3 events this year and several in the past. The RSXS is new to me. And my friend just got his 350Z. I have beat him in all 3 events this year. I'm on the stock tires he's on stock tires also, but his comes stock with ultra-hi-po tires.

What I'm sayin is that you ain't going to be good no matter what you do until you get lots of seat time.

Seat time first, then worry about what you want to do. :thumbsup:
 

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leishen said:
Hi,

I'm new to this forum, and autocross in general. I'm going to try to do my first in July. I was curious about the best things I can do for performance for the money for autocross. I have a base RSX, completely stock right now. I'm not planning on doing anything before the race in July, as I'm sure it won't matter since I need practice, but I was wondering what I should do in the long run.

If you have any suggestions, can you also let me know what recommendations you would have on the order in which to do them?

Thanks so much,
Greg
As I explained, you should go to your first event at least with better tires (not necessarily racing ones) and pads/fluid for the brakes. This will assure you a better RSX that will help you learn what a fast racing line is. If you go with stock tires or overheat the brakes, then you will be all the time over correcting the car, it will push the front and you will start to develop bad habits that are very difficult to change. It doesn't matter if some one beat a 350z with stock tires...I did it in my first event with this car (by almost 5 seconds), but another 350z beat me. So, what you need is a balanced car to make sure you get the best of it. Stock tires in this car will kill your learning experience, will make you think you are going fast and you will not learn the basics about racing lines, control braking and else.

I also recommend that when you have a few events, start with basic suspension and brakes. That will make you a faster driver when you add power to your ride. :thumbsup:
 

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I concur... the tires are a definite must, but to learn the real physics of the car you should run stock for a few events at least. The car is only good as the contact on the ground and the michelins just don't hold.

For a good inexpensive all season replacement, consider the Dunlops SP 5000 Asymmetrical. They go for about $110 a piece including shipping.

Many members in the northeast have them since we have crazy winters. Shibby runs on the 1/4 mile with them, I autox in them, and they're great for regular driving. Oh yeah, they do come in Z rated and higher as well. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
So what tire pressure do you run for these events? Also, when do you fill them? Is there generally some sort of facility there to fill them, or do I have to do it beforehand?

Thanks
 

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Have to fill them beforehand. Some people bring air compressors to fill their tires up, some do it at gas stations. At each event tire pressure will be different. My last one I just filled them to 40 front 40.5 rear. Then as you run, you can adjust if needed.
 

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boarderdf said:
Have to fill them beforehand. Some people bring air compressors to fill their tires up, some do it at gas stations. At each event tire pressure will be different. My last one I just filled them to 40 front 40.5 rear. Then as you run, you can adjust if needed.

You can get one of those little air compressor things that plug into your cigarette lighter for $30 or so (sears or auto parts store). They are a little slow, but when you are only adding 5-10 PSI not too bad. Just make sure you leave your car running while that thing is running...it can drain your battery if run too long.

Everyone has different opinion on pressures, but I am running Kumho MX's and 42 front/37 rear seems to be working for me, but experimentation is your friend.
 

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leishen said:
So what tire pressure do you run for these events? Also, when do you fill them? Is there generally some sort of facility there to fill them, or do I have to do it beforehand?

Thanks
First of all, when you decide what tire you are buying, you can call directly to the tire manufacturer and normally they will help you with tire pressure and temp recommendations. For example, when I started using Hoosiers, I called them and they send me more specific information, asked me the kind of car, mods, etc and told me the recommended preassure.

Second, whatever you do, get used to take air preassure and temperatures everytime you finish a heat or time in the track. That is what really tells you what your car is doing, what your tire is doing, what camber or toe you need and at the end...what is your driving style doing to the tires. Always take your preassure when you get to the track even if you didnt do any changes...sometimes tires can loose air and they dont lok flat.

Third, some tracks have air available but the recomendation given to bring your own plug in compresor is the best. Also, when you get more used to all of this, using nitrogen instead of regular air is great because the differences between cold and hot preassure is less and you can dialed better your suspension adjustments :wavey:
 

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lol...smartass
 
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