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What's the best way to go about lubing the chain? Is it possible to remove the side body panels (fairings?) to get to everything? Is the entirety of the chain exposed in some way in order to lube the whole thing, or do you just lube what's showing?

Specifically, I have a Ninja 250R...I don't know if some are removable and others aren't.

If I should start a separate thread just let me know.
 

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What's the best way to go about lubing the chain? Is it possible to remove the side body panels (fairings?) to get to everything? Is the entirety of the chain exposed in some way in order to lube the whole thing, or do you just lube what's showing?

Specifically, I have a Ninja 250R...I don't know if some are removable and others aren't.

If I should start a separate thread just let me know.
http://forums.clubrsx.com/showthread.php?t=481280

dude, there are a million threads about lubing the chain. try search. also, go to different bike forums such as sportbikes.net.

don't remove fairings.
the easiest way to lube the chain is by using a centerstand. twirl the wheel around, while lubing the chain at the rear sprocket area.
 

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Track Monster
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he cheated. lol

good info! I use simple green and belray chain lube to clean and lube my chain though.
Sorry to re-live an old thread. But to someone that might come across this might be misinformed about certain products to clean the chain with. Simple Green is by far the worst thing to use on a O-Ring chain. It is such a powerful degreaser that it can penetrate the O-Rings and deprive them of the oils sealed within the O-rings. Kerosene, in my opinion, is the best to clean the drive chain and sprockets. To each their own. :thumbsup:
 

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LOL wut
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Sorry to re-live an old thread. But to someone that might come across this might be misinformed about certain products to clean the chain with. Simple Green is by far the worst thing to use on a O-Ring chain. It is such a powerful degreaser that it can penetrate the O-Rings and deprive them of the oils sealed within the O-rings. Kerosene, in my opinion, is the best to clean the drive chain and sprockets. To each their own. :thumbsup:
I use kerosene...
 

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LOL wut
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Retired OG
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Any suggestions on carb maintenance?
yikes, Carbs suck, the only carb bike I ever had got gummed up over winter storage, adn it was like $250 bucks to clean out the next summer. Unfortunetaly none here, but if you don't have to store it over the winter months, you shouldn't have as much of an issue, just maintain it regularily, changing oil, having tune-ups done, etc...
 

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MY OTHER RIDE IS A VETTE
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as long as the bike u r buying has not sat for awhile unridden -- more than 2 yrs. it should be alright. Riding is the best carb maintaince. unfortunately alot of ppl buy bikes -- ride them once -- get the shit scared out of them and let them sit thinking they'll try again but never do. Then the carbs and everything get dried out and u get crude. then it's like BC said......250 to get them cleaned.

other than that good gas and change fuel filter should be enough.

that's why u should always let a shop check over a new purchase....at the very least u can talk down the price if u need the carb cleaned.
 

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Retired OG
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as long as the bike u r buying has not sat for awhile unridden -- more than 2 yrs. it should be alright. Riding is the best carb maintaince. unfortunately alot of ppl buy bikes -- ride them once -- get the shit scared out of them and let them sit thinking they'll try again but never do. Then the carbs and everything get dried out and u get crude. then it's like BC said......250 to get them cleaned.

other than that good gas and change fuel filter should be enough.

that's why u should always let a shop check over a new purchase....at the very least u can talk down the price if u need the carb cleaned.
Not true.

I bought a brand new 04 suzuki bandit, which was carbed, rode it all summer, it sat for 5 months in my garage, and the carbs neded a $300 cleaning the next summer. 5 months:mad:
 

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MY OTHER RIDE IS A VETTE
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Not true.

I bought a brand new 04 suzuki bandit, which was carbed, rode it all summer, it sat for 5 months in my garage, and the carbs neded a $300 cleaning the next summer. 5 months:mad:
really after 5 mnths -- that sucks... then again it was a SuSUCKi lol.
 

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No I won't pm you nudes
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My winter is a good 6 months out of the year, but during that time my dad has a heated garage I will be storing my bike in. So the only problem is the bike will be sitting there, it won't freeze over or anything.

It's carbed, and I was just planning on putting some fuel stabilizer in the tank, and putting a trickler on the battery when I went to put it away. I could go there once a month or so to start it up and let it warm up for 10 minutes... Anyone have recommendations so I won't have any problems in the spring?
 

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Retired OG
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How to change the oil on your bike *DIY*

I was bored while changing my oil today so I snapped some pics, nothing fancy, but if you are not mechanically inclined, or have never changed your oil, this might help.

Things you'll need.
  • Oil, my bike took about 2.75 quarts
  • Funnel
  • Oil filter (optional)
  • Oil filter socket (optional)
  • Container for your old oil
  • Lot's of paper towels
  • Various allen wrenches, and sockets (all depending on your bike)



Now today we will be changing oil on my 2007 Yamaha R6s. Typical sportbike with full fairings. You guys with naked bikes have it easy.

First things first, you will want to take a quick ride to warm up your bike and get the oil warmed up. I went for a quick 5 minute cruise and my bike had been sitting for a few weeks. (I know I suck) After you have warmed it up, you'll want to start removing the fairing(s) so you can get to the oil filter and oil drainage bolt. I choose to only remove one side since that is all that was neccesarry for me to complete this job. Now I'm not going into detail on how to remove your fairings because each bike is different, but more or less you just unscrew all the allen bolts and it should pop off. Lets fast forward to my left fairing being off.



OK, now that we have the fairings off, it's time to remove the oil drain plug (bolt). If you have no fairings or are really quick to take them off, make sure the bike has cooled down some otherwise the oil will burn you. My temp was about 146 when I started removing the drain bolt.

That is found towards the bottom of all engines and is usually out in a sort of open area, obviously because oil needs to pour out of it.

Mine is in the above picture to the lower right side of the pic, right next to the kickstand.

Here is a closer pic




Now mine happens to be a 17mm bolt, but yours may be different. It may be tight depending on who tightened last, even though I did mine last, I clearly tightened it too tight. If you are having trouble getting it off, make yourself extra leverage. I used a piece of handle from my floor jack, any pipe would do, the longer your wrench, the easier it is.


 

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Retired OG
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Once you break it free, it should come the rest of the way via your fingers, now this is the tricky/messy part. You need to remove this as fast as you can without dropping it into the oil pool which will follow. The first time I ever changed oil, I lost my bolt in the oil, the key is to go real slow, and hold pressure on it until you start to see oil seeping , then give it one more good twist loose and pull away quickly.





Once the oil is drained, I usually leave the bolt off, and let the remainder trickle down while we tackle the oil filter

This step is optional, but I highly suggest you change it with every oil change.

First you will need to loacte the oil filter.

Oh, hay, there it is.



As you can see it's filthy. This is a result of my filter being located right under the path of the chain, so shit is going to be on it constantly. You may have noticed the two silver things on the bottom of my filthy filter, those are magnets that I choose to put on the bottom to catch and metalic flakes or shavings that might be floating around my engine. Again, not neccesarry, but I choose to do it.

So lets remove my magnets and clean this off a bit so my oil filter wrench can actually do it's job.
Once you have it wiped down a bit, break out your trusty oil filter wrenche, here is mine attached to my cocket, adn then on the filter.


 

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Retired OG
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Now I apologize, I had a picture of the filter off, but my camera choose to destroy that pic, so it's a no show. Basically get the filter off, (there will be oil in it) and let it drain till there is no oil left in it.

Then an important step not to be forgotten, is put the drainage bolt back in, once you do this, we can put on the new filter. My manual says to tighten this to 31 ft lbs. so I did.




Then put a little oil inside the new filter, just a quick pour, and then also rub a little opil on the O-ring seal around the filter, then screw it back on.



My manual says to tighten the filter to 17 ft lbs. But I figure my hand tightening it is about the same. After I got he filter back on, I put back on my magnets, nice and clean again.




Now it is time to swing to the other side and put in some oil. I am guessing most bikes have the oil fill point on the right side of the bike, mine sure was, here it is .

 

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Retired OG
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Take off the cap like so.




And then start pouring. My manual says 2.75 qyarts so that's what I put in.




Once you have the desired amount in put the cap back on and start her up to see if you get an oil light. Some may say to check the dipstick or oil window first but I figure if I put in the required amount within 1/10th of a quart it should be fine.

I check the dipstick after I start it. Just my way of doing it.



All clear, just the neutral light and my highbeam indicator. Now here is a prime example of a picture I forgot. Check through your oil window to make sure it is at the right level, or if you have a dipstick, check the oil level that way.

If all is good, you are pretty much done. Now just dispose of the oil properly, and reassemble your bike.





And good as new.

 

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Retired OG
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There you have it, not the best, and also my first DIY so I know I forgot stuff, I'm sure my next one will be better. Comments welcome
 

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Beware the Eggplant
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nice work Cam.
 
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