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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, I've noticed something a little odd and I have a theory about it but I want to see what you guys thing.

My car is a mostly track car. I have Wilwood 12.2" rotors and 4 piston calipers. I run Wilwood's poly B pad compound on the track because I like its nice linear friction curve under heat. A very predictable pad.

I've noticed an odd pattern of wear though. The left front pads wear out first, with the outside pad on that wheel wearing significantly before the inside pad. Enough so that the outside pad will be nearly down to metal and I'll still have nearly 1/4 of the inside pad left. The right front wheel will have nearly even wear between the inside and the outside and will have much more pad material left than the left side.

My theory is that all the tracks I run are run clockwise. This puts me making more right hand turns so that the left side of the car is loaded more. More load on that side of the car means more traction there and so more brake torque. Thats the only thing I can think of anyway. If anyone else has an ideal please feel free to chime in.
 

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My track runs counter clockwise and I noticed that my right hand side pads wear out quicker..

One thing that might help is add more cooling to the side that is taking more abuse or getting more heat.
 

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I would think your theory about the track direction and wheel loads is the primary cause of the left side wearing faster than the right. As to why the outer pad on the left wears more than the inner, it may be a combination of pad knock back due to cornering forces and differential cooling between the inner and outer rotor faces. Do you have brake ducts? If so where are they aimed?
 

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I would think your theory about the track direction and wheel loads is the primary cause of the left side wearing faster than the right. As to why the outer pad on the left wears more than the inner, it may be a combination of pad knock back due to cornering forces and differential cooling between the inner and outer rotor faces. Do you have brake ducts? If so where are they aimed?
Exactly, thats why I recommeded more cooling for the brake that might be potentially getting more heat.

One thing I noticed for sure is because I had 4 inch brake duct that dumps into the wheel well (when wheels are pointed straight, ducts point towards the inside part of the tire).

My speculation as to why I had more wear on the right side on my counter-clockwise course is because everytime I turn left, the 4 inch dumps air to my left brakes because when the wheels are turned, it exposes the caliper/rotor to the ducting. But since most corners are left, the left gets more cooling than right hence the uneven wear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don't have any ducting on my car. I haven't had any fade issues so I saw no need to add it. I hadn't thought about temperature differentials though.
 

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I don't have any ducting on my car. I haven't had any fade issues so I saw no need to add it. I hadn't thought about temperature differentials though.
The primary reason i having ducting on my car was for pad life and consistency. I have a stoptech BBK and fading issues are non-existent with my carbotech xp-10 and xp-8 combo. Every time i step on the brake pedal it feels the same, requiring the same amount of effort weather its the first lap or 20th.
 

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Air flow is often the reason. One side may simply see more effective cool air to it than the other due to what's around it in the engine bay that disrupts the flow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Guess I'm going to have to look into adding some ducting then. Probably should have done that a while back anyway.

That makes me wonder if ducting will make it harder to get the pads up to temp on the tracks that aren't so hard on brakes. Something to think about anyway. I guess I can just run lower temp pads.:rolleyes:
 

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Guess I'm going to have to look into adding some ducting then. Probably should have done that a while back anyway.

That makes me wonder if ducting will make it harder to get the pads up to temp on the tracks that aren't so hard on brakes. Something to think about anyway. I guess I can just run lower temp pads.:rolleyes:
that's odd, even cold my carbotech xp-10 and xp-8 bite very hard and I have a serious ducting set-up
 

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Guess I'm going to have to look into adding some ducting then. Probably should have done that a while back anyway.

That makes me wonder if ducting will make it harder to get the pads up to temp on the tracks that aren't so hard on brakes. Something to think about anyway. I guess I can just run lower temp pads.:rolleyes:
Getting the pads on the front of the RSX up to operating temperature with brake ducts is not going to be your problem. ANYTHING you can do to cool your brakes will help. Like Xqizit, I run very high temp (1600F) track pads (Cobalt XR2) with dedicated ducts and they even work fine on the street on the way to the track. Modern track pads have a much broader operating range than race pads of past decades. When I added the ducts I significantly increased the pad life on my track pads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
that's odd, even cold my carbotech xp-10 and xp-8 bite very hard and I have a serious ducting set-up
I haven't had a problem, but I can notice a difference on the first couple of stops. Not a big deal, but more pedal effort is required to get the same braking.
These are the pads I'm running btw, the Wilwood Polymatrix B


If I add ducts I may look into something more like the Wilwood Polymatrix A


Getting the pads on the front of the RSX up to operating temperature with brake ducts is not going to be your problem. ANYTHING you can do to cool your brakes will help. Like Xqizit, I run very high temp (1600F) track pads (Cobalt XR2) with dedicated ducts and they even work fine on the street on the way to the track. Modern track pads have a much broader operating range than race pads of past decades. When I added the ducts I significantly increased the pad life on my track pads.

Like I said above. Its not that they don't work, just that more pedal effort is required. Still, longer pad life would be well worth it, and there are tons of pads available for the Wilwood calipers so its not like I'm lacking in choices. I'll just have to figure out what works best.

I have heard good things about the Carbotechs and Cobolts both as well so I'll have to look into what all is available. Sounds like a good winter project since due to budgetary constraints I'm pretty much done for the season anyway.:(
 

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I did not notice anyone address why the pads wore more at the top and less toward the axle. That is because the Wilwood calipers flex apart during hard hard track braking and temperatures. I ended up switching to a Brakeman caliper which is stiffer, and heavier.

I really liked the Wilwood "H" pads. I am now using Carbotech XP10. I think they feel very similar to one another.

I am almost done with a brake duct project. I will start a thread and post pictures.
 
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