Acura RSX, ILX and Honda EP3 Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
R.I.P. '02 RSX (Sold)
Joined
·
1,771 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Couple of issues on my RSX.

1 - My radiator cap wasn't on when I took it for a test drive after cleaning my throttle body. So some coolant spilled out of the car and covered the front part of the car. I ended up adding more coolant to the radiator and the tank next to it just incase I was low, and sprayed down the car with the hose to clean up the excess mess. I let my car sit for 2 days and now when ever it runs, it smokes. It's white smoke but with no burning smell. The car temperature is at normal but after 5 minutes it gets smokey. I don't see any leaks or cracks. Any idea what it can be?

2 - Replaced the front brake pads and I tried to bleed the line free of air, but it still gets real mushy. Do I have to do all 4 lines? Even if I did the front brakes?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,164 Posts
1. I assume the "smoke" is from the front end, engine compartment?
Coolant is slimy. If you didn't rinse it thoroughly enough the leftovers will evaporate slowly.

2. Were the brakes good before you replaced the pad?
You say they get real mushy. Do they feel firm at first and then get mushy?
How did you bleed them? Vacuum, or pressing the brake pedal?
 

·
R.I.P. '02 RSX (Sold)
Joined
·
1,771 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
1. I assume the "smoke" is from the front end, engine compartment?
Coolant is slimy. If you didn't rinse it thoroughly enough the leftovers will evaporate slowly.

2. Were the brakes good before you replaced the pad?
You say they get real mushy. Do they feel firm at first and then get mushy?
How did you bleed them? Vacuum, or pressing the brake pedal?
1. I’m going to assume that the smoke is left over coolant. I’ll pressure wash the bay and go from there.

2. I pressed the brakes. I replaced the pads because they were worn out, created a lot of brake dust. I actually think I did it wrong. I had the person keep pumping the brakes and not stop. I thought it was like doing theclutch. But would I still do all 4 or just the pads I replaced.
 

·
Registered
2002 RSX Type-S (99%Stock)
Joined
·
33 Posts
1. I’m going to assume that the smoke is left over coolant. I’ll pressure wash the bay and go from there.

2. I pressed the brakes. I replaced the pads because they were worn out, created a lot of brake dust. I actually think I did it wrong. I had the person keep pumping the brakes and not stop. I thought it was like doing theclutch. But would I still do all 4 or just the pads I replaced.
If you think air got into the master cyl then yeah, you'll have to bleed them all in sequence:

Front Left, Front Right, Rear Right, Rear Left. (That's from the service manual)

As for how to bleed the brakes, I like this video:

How to Bleed your Brakes by Yourself - YouTube

They understate the importance of having your tube and bottle higher than the caliper, I think it's key.
 

·
Been Around for a while
Joined
·
1,119 Posts
Interesting I didn't realize RSX starts with closest to Master Cylinder. Most or a lot of other cars (including my other three) start at the furthest point from the master
 

·
Registered
2002 RSX Type-S (99%Stock)
Joined
·
33 Posts
Interesting I didn't realize RSX starts with closest to Master Cylinder. Most or a lot of other cars (including my other three) start at the furthest point from the master
I know I was also surprised that's why I put it in there. But that's the bleed procedure according to the honda service manual. I'm sure there's a reason for it but they don't elaborate. It'd be nice to know why, and decide if its actually important.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,164 Posts
Where you start from isn't absolutely critical, but it helps. The important part is to NOT let up on the pedal while the bleeder is open. Pump brakes to pressure, open bleeder, have assistant announce when pedal is almost to the floor. Close bleeder. Keep holding pedal down until the bleeder is closed. Then pump up and repeat.
 

·
Registered
2002 RSX Type-S (99%Stock)
Joined
·
33 Posts
Where you start from isn't absolutely critical, but it helps. The important part is to NOT let up on the pedal while the bleeder is open. Pump brakes to pressure, open bleeder, have assistant announce when pedal is almost to the floor. Close bleeder. Keep holding pedal down until the bleeder is closed. Then pump up and repeat.
You're right, and that's how we learned it in tech school also. But hard to do alone with 2 x 4s lol

Idk I've done it both ways and the pedal ends up feeling normal in both. I really believe having the hose and make-shift reservoir higher than the caliper makes a huge difference.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top