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Discussion Starter #1
Just wonderin if someone could explain the differnce between these different HIDs - Im guessing the higher the brighter..:dontknow:


-jon:thumbsup:
 

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I'm being nice because I need 40 posts to hit 200 to qualify for ClAs prize.

the higher tha K the lower the brightness. 4300 is the brightess.

4300 - white
5000 - blue
6000 - purple.

6000 is still way brighter than stock, and looks cooler, that's why ppl get it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hwangster said:
I'm being nice because I need 40 posts to hit 200 to qualify for ClAs prize.

the higher tha K the lower the brightness. 4300 is the brightess.

4300 - white
5000 - blue
6000 - purple.

6000 is still way brighter than stock, and looks cooler, that's why ppl get it.
is he right people?:laughing:

-jonnyboy:thumbsup: :driving:
 

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If you go to www.Xenondepot.com they have pics of all three HID systems in the gallery. You can compare them side by side.
 

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The first response is correct. I have the 6000k kit and love the look. It has a bluish/purplish tinge that looks very much like OEM HID kits and is still *very* bright compared to stock. A beautiful mod. The night I got them I saw people at stoplights pointing over at them excitedly. XD is great.

:spin:
 

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Hwangster said:
I'm being nice because I need 40 posts to hit 200 to qualify for ClAs prize.

the higher tha K the lower the brightness. 4300 is the brightess.

4300 - white
5000 - blue
6000 - purple.

6000 is still way brighter than stock, and looks cooler, that's why ppl get it.
Actually I believe the higher the K (which stands for Kelvin, a measure of heat/light) the brighter or hotter the color temperature. However, the higher you go in Kelvin the more blue/purple the light becomes. So it is actually brighter but to the naked eye it may not seem as bright as the 4000k (white light) brightness because it changes color once you go above the temperature. Does that make sense?
 

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e90
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SixSigma said:
Actually I believe the higher the K (which stands for Kelvin, a measure of heat/light) the brighter or hotter the color temperature. However, the higher you go in Kelvin the more blue/purple the light becomes. So it is actually brighter but to the naked eye it may not seem as bright as the 4000k (white light) brightness because it changes color once you go above the temperature. Does that make sense?
You are correct, the light output on the road gets less the higher the number. I have 4500K and it is pure white, and will not go to 6000K cuz a friend has them and it is hard on the eyes for night driving, too purple. Sucks in the rain
 

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I haven't had a problem in the rain. The 6000k does have a bluish tinge, but it looks and performs like the stock HID in Acura TLs I have driven.

:spin:
 

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a comparison was made to black lights, which are 12000K I believe. And they are pretty purple :)

Bright white does crappy in the snow..........

It's all up to your prefrence, I got them for practical purposes, so I got the cheapest one. If 6000K was cheaper I woulda bought those, but 4300 was a good price, so I bought those instead.
 

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The higher the temperature the lower the brightness, the higher the temperature the more purple the color, the lower the more red.

White is the brightest because white is a combination of every color in the spectrum which means it emits a much greater number of photons. The more color toned it becomes the fewer particles of light you're emitting because you're only emitting a single specific color.
 

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The kelvin unit is the basis of all temperature measurement, starting with 0 k (= -273.16° C) at the absolute zero temperature. The "size" of one kelvin is the same as that of one degree Celsius, and is defined as the fraction 1/273.16 of the thermodynamic temperature of the triple point of water, which positions 0° Celsius at 273.16 k.)

Technically, color temperature refers to the temperature to which one would have to heat a theoretical "black body" source to produce light of the same visual color.

Some typical color temperatures are:

1500 k Candlelight

2680 k 40 W incandescent lamp

3000 k 200 W incandescent lamp

3200 k Sunrise/sunset

3400 k Tungsten lamp

3400 k 1 hour from dusk/dawn

5000-4500 k Xenon lamp/light arc

5500 k Sunny daylight around noon

5500-5600 k Electronic photo flash

6500-7500 k Overcast sky

9000-12000 k Blue sky
 

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well the 6000k is blue... and the best looking IMO
 

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Interesting her SixsSigma, do you work on quality?


SixSigma said:
The kelvin unit is the basis of all temperature measurement, starting with 0 k (= -273.16° C) at the absolute zero temperature. The "size" of one kelvin is the same as that of one degree Celsius, and is defined as the fraction 1/273.16 of the thermodynamic temperature of the triple point of water, which positions 0° Celsius at 273.16 k.)

Technically, color temperature refers to the temperature to which one would have to heat a theoretical "black body" source to produce light of the same visual color.

Some typical color temperatures are:

1500 k Candlelight

2680 k 40 W incandescent lamp

3000 k 200 W incandescent lamp

3200 k Sunrise/sunset

3400 k Tungsten lamp

3400 k 1 hour from dusk/dawn

5000-4500 k Xenon lamp/light arc

5500 k Sunny daylight around noon

5500-5600 k Electronic photo flash

6500-7500 k Overcast sky

9000-12000 k Blue sky
 

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I work for a major insurance company. We use the SixSigma methodology for process integrations and projection analysis as well as numerous other things. I'm am a certified SixSigma Black Belt.
 
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