Acura RSX, ILX and Honda EP3 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 107 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
864 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey guys :wavey:

Before I go anywhere with this, SLOW INTERNET USERS BEWARE!

So if you're having trouble with your ball joints and you own an 05-06 RSX Type-S you may have noticed that the internet is void of any solution to your problem. Acura recommends buying a whole new knuckle which I have heard is about $300 to purchase.

As a remedy, a lot of people have reported using the BB6 lower ball joints as a replacement. Well, I'm going to show you how I used the BB6 lower ball joints in my steering knuckles. Hopefully I save you some money.

___________________________________________________________________

Disclaimer: I am not responsible for any inconvenient or undesirable outcomes that may result from following these instructions.

Parts needed:

1.) Jack and jack stands
2.) 1/4", 3/8", and 1/2" ratchets
3.) 8 mm, 10 mm, 12 mm, 17 mm, 19 mm, 22 mm, 36 mm
4.) Table Vice
5.) 2 lbs mallet
6.) 1 lbs hammer
7.) Sleeve to fit around inner diameter of ball joint to disperse hammer impact
8.) Cheater bar
9.) Flat head screw driver
10.) Phillips screw driver
11.) Pittman Tie-Rod Arm Puller
12.) Tie-Rod Separator Pickle Fork
13.) Impact gun (I used an old electric one, so if you brake a stud with your 180 gal compressor tank don't blame me)
14.) Chisel
15.) BB6 Prelude Lower Ball Joint (Information Taken from ClubRSX.com)

Go to the following link to purcahse the ball joints that I purchased. Note, I am not responsible if problems ensue as a result of installing ball joints not specific to this car model.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000C9Q0VM/ref=pe_385040_30332200_pe_309540_26725410_item

Recommended and Optional Parts:

1.) Puller (three-armed puller from Harbor Freight)
2.) Rust penetrant (PB-Blaster etc)
3.) Lube
4.) Axle Grease
5.) This kit from NAPA that lbk05dc5 brought to my attention. <---THAT WOULD HAVE HELPED A FUDGING TON (FYI)

do you think this would have worked on it?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=89KiZz5F_-A

it shows that tool is also used for the prelude ball joints.
After putting your car up on jack stands safely, remove the wheel.



Remove your wheel speed sensor cable bracket and your brake line from your strut. I believe the brake line is held on with a 12 mm bolt and the wheel speed sensor line is held on with a 10 mm bolt.



I'm also pretty sure that the caliper is held on with two 12 mm bolts. You're going to want to remove the two outer bolts shown in the next picture.



After removing the caliper, hang it up on your shock to prevent it from dangling by your brake line and spewing brake fluid everywhere.



Next, remove your brake caliper bracket from your steering knuckle. This bracket is held onto the knuckle with two 17 mm bolts. They're husky, so you may need some rust penetrant and a cheater bar.



Undo the notch that is present in the flange of the 36 mm spindle nut with a flat head screw driver. I used a mallet to bang on the end of the screw driver to make my life easier.



Use the 36 mm socket to remove the spindle nut from the spindle. I used an impact gun for this. I've never tried this job without an impact gun, but if you wish then by all means be my guest.



Take your phillips head screw driver and use it to remove the screws holding the rotor to the hub.

I recommend taking the bit from the phillips head screw driver shown below and hammering it into the screw, then taking a 1/4" ratchet and a socket to turn the phillips bit and putting the lodged bit in the socket. Get some rust penetrant and spray it on the screw and turn away.

Be careful not to strip your screws. Hammering the phillips bit into the screw before twisting will hopefully help with this.



Now, remove the cotter pin from the castle nut holding the ball joint onto the lower control arm (LCA). It's shown in the picture below:



Take your Pittman Tie-Rod Arm Puller and your tie-rod separator pickle fork and lay them out to prepare for usage!!!



Place the Pittman Arm Puller in between the ball joint and the LCA. Tighten the bolt on the Pittman tool onto the ball joint so that it secures the "stud" coming out of the ball in the ball joint's ball and socket mechanism.

Doing this gives a solid object to absorb the impact that you'll need to apply to separate the ball joint from the LCA.





Then, take the pickle fork and place it in between the Pittman tool and the ball joint. Hit the end of the pickle fork with the 2 lbs mallet until you hear a loud "POP" noise. At this point, the ball joint will be separated from the LCA.



Here's what it'll look like when the two are separated:



Next, remove the strut bolts from the part of the strut which clamps onto the steering knuckle. There are two 19 mm bolts each held on by two 22 mm nuts. Hold the bolts still while turning the nuts until they loosen.





Now, remove the wheel speed sensor. This is located on the steering knuckle, behind the dust guard (the dust guard is the black shield that sits behind the rotor). I'm pretty sure it is held on with a 10 mm bolt, though it may be an 8 mm bolt.



The following step involves an optional tool... You could use the puller to remove the spindle from the hub, but you can also have one person hold the axle while you pull on the knuckle.

Whichever works for you is great, however you can save $20 by having someone hold the axle.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
864 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Here's the knuckle: :blah:



Now it's time to clamp that knuckle in a vice. Take the end of the knuckle that is connected to the strut and clamping it down with the table vice. Then, take the cheater bar and use it to tighten the vice's grip on the knuckle.



Spray some rust penetrant around the ball joint and then take your two pound mallet and wack on the ball joint as hard as you can. Make sure your are applying your force at the tip of the "stud" to transfer as much impact as possible.

Don't be afraid to eff shizzle up. <--forum language



When it comes out, it may look pretty messed up. Don't be surprised. You were just whaling on it. It may be a good idea to check how bad your ball joint is BEFORE you start hitting it with a hammer. That will give you a better idea of what you were riding on.



Take your new, pretty ball joint, and spray the circumference of the mating surface with rust penetrant or lube to help it go into the knuckle. Then, spray the mating surface on the knuckle with some rust penetrant or lube as well.



Placing the knuckle in the vice as shown below, take your ball joint and put it into the knuckle. Then, with a hammer, tap around the edges of the ball joint so that it goes in evenly. Make sure that the threads of the ball joint are not contacting any surface below the steering knuckle that may be presented due to a low-hanging vice.



Next, you're going to want to really wack this ball joint into the steering knuckle. Place the knuckle in the vice like you had it when you were REMOVING the ball joint and take a sleeve that will fit around the inner diameter of the ball joint like this:



Here's how it should look when you place it around the balljoint:



Almost in!



If you're persistent it should take you about an hour to complete this step. Just bang away and be careful not to damage anything. It's easy but it's tedious.

Make sure the seat of the ball joint is flush with the knuckle. I've seen people who recommend just banging it in until you can put your snap ring on, but I'm anal. Choose whichever you think is more safe/easier/worth it overall.



Now take your dust boot ring off and prepare yourself for greasing! If you buy a cheap ball joint from Taiwan or something, then you'll need to do this. However if you buy the one in the link I provided, then you should be fine. I did it just to be safe.



Note that if you do this step after putting on the snap ring it's much easier!



Now you're ready to put the snap ring on. The snap ring should have two little holes at the open ends of the ring, but if yours is dumb like mine was be prepared to wedge that crap in with two screw drivers and a hammer. It's a nightmare.



FINALLY.



Now, re-install your dust boot being careful not to get dust or dirt in your grease. Put the ring on the dust boot and you'll be good to go!

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
864 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Now, feast your eyes on your magic carpet ride. ALADDIN UP IN THIS :lolza:



Pull the spindle through the hub and lightly secure it using the spindle nut. This will prevent it from falling out. When re-installing the spindle, be sure the axle does not come out of the transmission. Make sure that when you rotate the hub you hear the transmission moving.



Now, take your 22 mm castle nut and torque it onto the ball joint with an impact gun. I did it as tight as I could to ensure nothing would come apart while I was driving.ow, take your 22 mm castle nut and torque it onto the ball joint with an impact gun. I did it as tight as I could to ensure nothing would come apart while I was driving.



Now, insert the cotter pin and bend it around the castle nut. This is your fail safe:



Now, put your strut bolts back in and tighten em up.



Put your rotor back on the hub and make sure it's flat. Then screw it in with the phillips screws.



Put your caliper bracket and brake pads back on. If the brake pads need more anti-squeal grease, then by all means, re-apply.



Torque your spindle nut and then take a chisel and a two pound mallet. After torquing the nut, take your chisel and place it directly above the notch on the spindle. Then, take your two pound mallet and bang the flange into the groove.



Reconnect your wheel speed sensor, wheel speed sensor line bracket, and your brake line to the strut. Also, don't forget to reattach your brake caliper. That'd be bad if you didn't :eek:



Making sure everything is torqued to spec under those wheels and then put your Work Emotion CR Ka-- err...your wheels back on. :laughing:

Take your car off jacks and your good to go! :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
864 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Yup! That would work great! Thanks for posting that up. May edit the diy for that.

The problem with certain ball joint tools isnt the ball joint, its the clearance between the top seat of the ball joint and the inner part of the steering knuckle on the rsx. The harbor freight caliper tool does mot work on this.
 

·
DC5
Joined
·
4,574 Posts
Yup! That would work great! Thanks for posting that up. May edit the diy for that.

The problem with certain ball joint tools isnt the ball joint, its the clearance between the top seat of the ball joint and the inner part of the steering knuckle on the rsx. The harbor freight caliper tool does mot work on this.
would this work for a 04 type s?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
864 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
would this work for a 04 type s?
Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe the 02-04 can have its ball joints directly replaced. Not need for these shenanigans. But that tool will probably work. I don't see why it wouldn't.

I just want to say thank you. I was looking at, up to, $500 per side to get this done. You saved me $700 or so. Got both sides done and an oil change for $300!!!!
No problem sir :thumbsup: I spent somewhere around 150 bucks then got like 80 bucks refunded when I returned my tools like a scum...never again though because that's corny and I don't want to be "that guy"
 

·
DC5
Joined
·
4,574 Posts
Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe the 02-04 can have its ball joints directly replaced. Not need for these shenanigans. But that tool will probably work. I don't see why it wouldn't.



No problem sir :thumbsup: I spent somewhere around 150 bucks then got like 80 bucks refunded when I returned my tools like a scum...never again though because that's corny and I don't want to be "that guy"
so I should just buy oem ball joints? for 0204?
 
1 - 20 of 107 Posts
Top