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I heard about a free and easy ding removal technique. Sounds crazy, but i'd like to know if it works. Apparently, you place an ice cube on a ding when the paint is VERY hot. The ding is suppose to pop out by itself. Is this true?. Its winter here in Montreal, so I cant try it until the summer. Let me if this really works...thanks.
 

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This method is used by some professional shops to take care of light hail damage, I suppose it depends on how bad the ding is, but theoraticly it makes sense since metals tend to contract with low tempratures. You can try heating it with a hair dryer or boiling water and then putting an ice cube on it and see what happens.
 

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I've never heard of this. My first impression would be fear that the hot/cold combo would crack the paint.

If you're willing to risk this, let us know how it works out.
 

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gtp618 said:
Look in the yellow pages under paintless dent repair. If you want it done the right way, find a local tech. Most guarantee their work.

:iamwiths:
had previous experience with door dings, works great. The whole ice cube/hair dryer thing sounds like something that should be on "ripley's believe it or not":wtf:
 

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"7. There is a small dent in the top of your car, maybe from where a walnut hit it after falling out of that big tree you were parked under last week. You heard from a friend that there is a simple way to remove the dent. You should park your car in the sun on a hot summer day and let the metal near the dent get nice and hot. Then, you friend tells you, if you place an ice cube in the dent it will pop out. Why might this work?

Answer: The metal will cool quickly near the ice cube causing it to contract, which may pop the dent out.

Why: A friend did tell me this trick, although I have never tried it. In concept it sounds like it might work, but I'm sure it depends on the dent.
"

This is actually a physics question from virginia university. Check out this link:
http://rabi.phys.virginia.edu/105/1999/PS9a.html
 
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