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Broke Modifier
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Discussion Starter #1
so i'm chaning my front brake pads and I'm a NEWB! did seraches and had no luck. Please help :( my car is up on jacks right now
 

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Broke Modifier
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1,069 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
damn good game no rematch

Here is a tip. The bolts you remove are NOT the bolts that mount the caliper to the spindle (ie: do not remove the whole caliper to get to the pads). Rather, there are two smaller bolts that the main caliper body mounts on to the caliper bracket with. These bolts are actually pins that the caliper floats side to side on. Anyway, all you need to do is remove ONE of these bolts (the lower one) and then the caliper body will pivot upward on the other pin and allow you to remove the pads. It will make sense when you look at the caliper.

As far as pushing the piston back in, here's what happens. As the old pad wear, the piston pushes farther and farther out of the caliper to compensate for the thinner pads. When you put thick new pads in, the piston is still too extended to allow you to put two pads and a rotor between the piston and the outer part of the caliper. So you have to push the piston back in to make room to fit everything in. Make sense? It's best to use a piston tool to compress the piston, but I always use a large blunt object to press it back in manually. But that's it. Remove the lower pin, pivot the caliper up, remove pads, press the piston back in, install new pads, pivot the caliper back over the rotor, and re-intstall the pin. You're done.

was all i found
 

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Broke Modifier
Joined
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1,069 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
damn good game no rematch

Here is a tip. The bolts you remove are NOT the bolts that mount the caliper to the spindle (ie: do not remove the whole caliper to get to the pads). Rather, there are two smaller bolts that the main caliper body mounts on to the caliper bracket with. These bolts are actually pins that the caliper floats side to side on. Anyway, all you need to do is remove ONE of these bolts (the lower one) and then the caliper body will pivot upward on the other pin and allow you to remove the pads. It will make sense when you look at the caliper.

As far as pushing the piston back in, here's what happens. As the old pad wear, the piston pushes farther and farther out of the caliper to compensate for the thinner pads. When you put thick new pads in, the piston is still too extended to allow you to put two pads and a rotor between the piston and the outer part of the caliper. So you have to push the piston back in to make room to fit everything in. Make sense? It's best to use a piston tool to compress the piston, but I always use a large blunt object to press it back in manually. But that's it. Remove the lower pin, pivot the caliper up, remove pads, press the piston back in, install new pads, pivot the caliper back over the rotor, and re-intstall the pin. You're done.

was all i found
 

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pǝuuɐq
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3,271 Posts
TypeSOwnz said:
damn good game no rematch

Here is a tip. The bolts you remove are NOT the bolts that mount the caliper to the spindle (ie: do not remove the whole caliper to get to the pads). Rather, there are two smaller bolts that the main caliper body mounts on to the caliper bracket with. These bolts are actually pins that the caliper floats side to side on. Anyway, all you need to do is remove ONE of these bolts (the lower one) and then the caliper body will pivot upward on the other pin and allow you to remove the pads. It will make sense when you look at the caliper.

As far as pushing the piston back in, here's what happens. As the old pad wear, the piston pushes farther and farther out of the caliper to compensate for the thinner pads. When you put thick new pads in, the piston is still too extended to allow you to put two pads and a rotor between the piston and the outer part of the caliper. So you have to push the piston back in to make room to fit everything in. Make sense? It's best to use a piston tool to compress the piston, but I always use a large blunt object to press it back in manually. But that's it. Remove the lower pin, pivot the caliper up, remove pads, press the piston back in, install new pads, pivot the caliper back over the rotor, and re-intstall the pin. You're done.

was all i found
and that's all you need to know. What, you want pop ups?
 

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and.....with that info, you can't do the job? that's all you need
 

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Broke Modifier
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Discussion Starter #9
got it thanks :(
 

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Four Rings
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5,094 Posts
im pretty sure theres even a vid walk through on there too...
 

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Broke Modifier
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1,069 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
fiured it out thanks :(
 

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Broke Modifier
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Discussion Starter #15
god it done and taken care of thanks guys... easiest job EVAR LoL...
 

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Quick tip for ya. Next time around, I'd refrain from using a blunt object to push the caliper piston back into its bore. Get yourself either a pad spreader (like the one here http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?pid=00947066000&vertical=AUTO&BV_UseBVCookie=Yes) or a big pair of channel locks. I've seen a few caliper pistons cracked because of people not having the proper tools and calipers can be expensive since most of the time you can't just get the piston, seal and dust boot.
Good work, keep it up. Before you know it you'll be swapping engines
 

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Quick tip for ya. Next time around, I'd refrain from using a blunt object to push the caliper piston back into its bore. Get yourself either a pad spreader (like the one here http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?pid=00947066000&vertical=AUTO&BV_UseBVCookie=Yes) or a big pair of channel locks. I've seen a few caliper pistons cracked because of people not having the proper tools and calipers can be expensive since most of the time you can't just get the piston, seal and dust boot.
Good work, keep it up. Before you know it you'll be swapping engines
a good sized C clamp can do the job too :thumbsup:
 
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