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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I bought the kit a while back, and quickly realized it would be a buttload of work to install these simple looking bushings. Here's my experiences with it.

For starters, I won't cover basic suspension disassembly. It's covered in the service manual, and if you don't have that, you don't stand a chance. Go download/purchase it before anything else.

The rear end

My rear cam bolts were very stuck. They come apart in three pieces. The cam bolt, the cam nut (24mm), and the locking nut (17mm). It took WD-40, a torch, and much hammering on the 17mm nut to get it to come apart. You're supposed to replace the 17mm locking nut anyway, so I guess bashing the ever loving crap out of it wasn't the worst thing.


On both sides, my ABS sensors were completely seized in place. On the drivers side, you can disconnect the wire. On the passenger side, the connector isn't so easy to find. I decided I'd just replace the bushings without removing the ABS wire.


As the instructions that come with the kit mention, use washers and threaded rod to push out the old rubber bushings. Use two nuts locked together on the stationary end. Also spray some grease on the threaded rod to prevent galling.


For the second bushing, you'll need a block of metal or wood with a hole in it to push against the knuckle.


The old, and the new.


Lube up the inside and outside of the new bushings. I was able to push the center dowel in about halfway by hand.


Be lazy like me and use a C-clamp to drive the dowel the rest of the way.


Dripping with lube. Ain't that sexy.



Part Two will include how to take apart that (!*&% trailing arm pin. Stay tuned.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
nice. how many miles on youre suspension before replacement
I only have 105,000km on the car, but it was winter driven a couple times. The old rubber bushings seem fine. I just wanted the "performance upgrade".

On my '99 CRV, the rubber bushings are starting to need replacing. It has about 245,000 km on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
As promised, here's part 2 of the rear.

Once you have the rear trailing arm out, stick it in a vice thusly. You really need a solid vice that is bolted to a solid work bench.


Get the biggest crescent wrench you own and position it thusly. Put it low on the flange so you don't risk bending or breaking the hole. DO NOT put anything through the hole to reef on it, or you will risk damaging it.


You really have to throw your weight into it... many times. Try adding some heat if needed. Once it rotates, you can use a large screw driver or pry bar to push the top off while you rotate. As you may notice, in this case the bottom side got loose. Just flip the arm over and remove one of the two sides.


Once it is apart, it will look something like this.


Using a utility knife, cut away the top of the rubber.


You will see the center pin is held by four rubber connections. I decided to try drilling through the center of these to weaken them. I ended up slightly rubbing the pin which isn't great, but not a huge factor. A better way might just be to use a sharp, pointy knife. The idea is to weaken the rubber. Once it's weakened, I rotated the arm around the pin until the rubber broke. Keep rotating, and use a screw driver to pry the arm away from the pin.

Some people suggest a torch. Since I was working in my garage, and it's -20C outside, that wasn't an option for me.


Once it's destroyed, it will look like this.


The part of the bushing left in the arm is two pieces, and should come out by hand.


Chop off as much rubber from the pin as possible with the utility knife.


I then use a coarse file to get the rest of the rubber. Try not to get into the metal.


To put the new bushing in, lube it up, put the two parts over the pin and press it into the arm. If you don't have a press, try a clamp or vice. I rarely get to use my press, so I went for it. Notice the thicker bushing goes towards the back of the car.


Then align the other half of the pin and press it together. I think you might need a press for this, or you could try getting creative with a jack or vice.


The rest is just re-assembly.

Some things I found.

- My car was a bit rusty for some bolts. I chased all those holes/bolts with tapp and die. It made re-assembly easier.
- Put grease on all the bolts that go through bushings.
- Use anti-seize and you'll have less problems next time.
- Now is a good time to check/service your brakes.
- Wipe off your rotors with brake cleaner or isopropanol alcohol in case you got sticky bushing grease on them.
- You should probably go get an alignment done.

I'm planning to do the front in the next couple months... there may be a part 3.
 

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Ziomekk
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Nice, I replace all of mine with Energy Suspension: Polyurethane bushing same as you, but i used big torch to burn rubber out and a hydraulic press on some of them, the car handles great and cornering is awesome , it gets bumpy sometimes, but you should use Teflon tape on the outside of the bushings, b/c after some time lube dries up and it will make noise sometimes...
 

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if your stock rubber bushings are shot these will make a huge difference. more so in front than the rear.
 

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One thing I don't get, and I'm half way through the install, is how the disassembled piece with the two holes on each side, is supposed go stick back together. Mine just popped apart in two pieces with one piece having the whole middle section attached and the other just having the lip of it. So that the one piece will stick in but it looks like the other end is just gonna sit on the outside. Understand?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
One thing I don't get, and I'm half way through the install, is how the disassembled piece with the two holes on each side, is supposed go stick back together. Mine just popped apart in two pieces with one piece having the whole middle section attached and the other just having the lip of it. So that the one piece will stick in but it looks like the other end is just gonna sit on the outside. Understand?
Not sure I follow.

In the second last image, I'm using a hydraulic press to get the last bushing piece on. I couldn't get it to go by hand.. it would just slide and pop off. On the last image, I use the press to attach the other half of the pin.
 

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failed miserably with separating the pins. Got all fucked up. Good and bad new, on my other arm the eccentric bolt rust welded into the sleeve. Ended up bending the bolt at 90 degrees trying to free it with pb blaster, wd40, map torch, air hammer, 8 lb sledge, c-clamps and prybars. Had to order a new arm so I get another shot. Have to do it 2 times more though. FML
 

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I did this on the springs of my 4Runner back in the fall when I overhauled them (30yr and 365kmiles). New stuff makes no noise.

You should stick with the Energy Suspension "Black" versions, they are impregnated with graphite to add a lubrication effect.

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-rFlr--rwuLo/UeLWZVLE2XI/AAAAAAAAHgQ/X_HhUiu7-j0/s800/IMAGE_E52FCC88-1875-45E9-91CF-50109ED591D2.JPG
I already had the red ones installed and they are real creaky sounding. What could be the problem?
 
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