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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2003 rsx s with 50,000 miles ans just replaced rotors and pads, only the front ones. I had vibrations on the pedal and the steering wheel, not any more though, since i changed them. But do i have to bleed or flush the brake fluid after the install, by the way i didnt do it but should i? Its designed to be a seal system and shouldn t be opened unless there is a major problem. Im a daily driver with stock pads and discs.
 

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I think you should.
 

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The older your brake fluid the more water it has in it. Even a small amount of water dramatically lowers the fluids boiling point. This is a major concern of people that track their car on a road course. If you just DD your car as you say you should be fine so long as the pedal feels good and firm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
the brake pedal doesn t have that sudden stopping feel that a new car has but its not soft or misssing pressure. Its normal feel. If not now then when should i do it?
 

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the brake pedal doesn t have that sudden stopping feel that a new car has but its not soft or misssing pressure. Its normal feel. If not now then when should i do it?
when you change brake pads, in my experince, its always a good idea to bleed the system with fresh fluid. most people can slap on pads and be done with it, but the braking system is how important to you? just my 2 cents
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
ok im convinced ill do it. although ive never change my fluid on any of my cars before. Whats the most popular procedure and most efficient way that will get rid of all the old fluid in the brake system.
 

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DC5 Krew
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it wouldnt be a bad idea to flush them out but u really dont have to thoe. u should do a brake fluid flush i think every 2 years or every 40k on or car
 

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In spite of being a "sealed" system, brake fluid invariably absorbs moisture. Water is much more compressible than brake fluid, thus biennial flushing recommended by Honda for our cars.
 

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FI != NA
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First - flush brake lines only if you have patience and feel extremely comfortable doing it. If you get air into your lines, it will cause very serious problems - from your master cylinder not working correctly, or the brakes not working at all!

If you do not feel comfortable with this, take it to a shop and have them bleed it, it is better to pay a little more to get it done correctly then find out after you loose your brakes.

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This is only a guide. I am not a professional mechanic. Use this information at your own risk. There are threads on how to bleed brakes and you can lookup on Google

If you clicked on the google link, you'll notice that there are several ways to bleed your system...force flush, reverse flush, gravity, pedal pumping etc...I'm only focusing on the 2-man pedal pumping.
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Still with me? Ok...

- 2 people; one to work bleeder valve and watch fluids and one to work brake pedal
- Brake cleaner (not necessary, but good to have)
- Bleeder kit (not necessary, but good to have)
- 1.5l of DOT3 or DOT4 brake fluid. DO NOT use DOT5. If you are doing autocross, go with a DOT4 fluid such as ATE Super Blue, or Motul RBF600. The major difference between DOT3 and 4 are the boiling points...when using brakes heavily (racing) you heat up the brake fluid, DOT3 can turn into a gas earlier than DOT4; which causes brake fade because gas can compress more than liquid.

Helms states that you go in this order:
1. Driver Front
2. Passenger Front
3. Passenger Rear
4. Driver Rear

I recommend buying a simple brake bleeding kit...$3.00. It will consist of a small catch bottle (and may include a magnetic hanger to hold the bottle), but more importantly is a clear tube that will connect to the end of your bleeder valve and the catch bottle. Also, have a bucket or container to empty your catch bottle periodically. (Note, you could also just get clear tubing -- like for fish tank air compressor; it just needs to fit over bleeder valve snuggly -- and drain it into bucket directly)

Remove your wheels (I put the whole car on jack stands...keeping it level, but having access to all four lines at once) the basic procedure is:

1. Make sure brake reservoir (master cylinder) is full (at all times - never let it go below minimum level)

2. Hook up your bleeding bottle (if you have it), or place bucket under bleeder valve

3. Loosen bleeder valve enough to allow pressure from brake pedal to push fluid and any debris out.

4. Ask the brake operator to push brake to the floor and hold. (This will push brake fluid out)
4a. IF YOU DO NOT HAVE BLEEDER KIT. Lock (tighten) the bleeder valve BEFORE releasing brake pedal...if you do not do this, you will suck air into the line.
4b. If you do have a brake bleeder kit, you can keep pumping the brake without locking valve during brake release except for last pump. The reason you can do this is because there is still fluid in the bleeder kits tubing, thus it pulls no air into the brake lines.

(NOTE: ALWAYS push pedal to floor and then lock bleeder valve; the way the brake system works is by pulling from the master cyclinder while brake is applied, and pulling from the brake lines when the pedal is released - thus keeping pressure equalized).


5. Repeat steps three, 4, and 4a or 4b until you may see a change in the fluid coming out, both in color and possibly cleaner - no debris. By the end of this step, you will probably have used about 1/3 to 1/2 of your first 500ml bottle of brake fluid. (Note: make sure you keep your brake fluid reservoir filled, otherwise you will suck air into the lines)

6. Lock the bleeder valve and remove any excess fluid from around valve and then spray down with brake cleaner (cleans and dries fast)

7. Repeat for each brake line in the order indicated above. You will notice it will take less brake fluid with each brake line. By the time I finished my flush, I had used only about 900ml - but you want to have 1.5l available just in case.

8. Once you have completed all four lines, you may want to bleed lines through one more time...this time it will be to check that you have no air (bubbles) in the lines, so 3-5 pumps.

9. make sure all bleeder valves are tight, cleaned, and dry. then apply brake pressure...the brake should not move at all, or feel mushy. Check all bleeder valves to ensure there was no fluid leaking and that all lines are tight.

10. Replace wheels, tighten bolts (80ft lbs if I remember right), and take for a test drive around the block at normal speeds...no vtec'n...this will help you keep control of the car in case there are any problems. You want to feel the brakes...are they mushy? Is it loosing pressure? fading? etc.

If done right, you will have a solid feel and depending on how bad the fluid/consistency was of the old stuff...you might stop faster.

We recently changed my fluid, not only was it darker than my oil :eek: but it had debris in the line as well...I will be replacing the lines soon! However with the flush, my car stops a lot better than it used to, and the brake feels more solid....and now I know there is an issue that needs to be addressed before it gets serious.

Lastly, before you dispose your used brake fluid, take a good look at it:
- is it seperating (water in lines)
- is it dark/discolored
- was there debris in the lines...is the debris hard/rusty/metallic or dissolvable
This information could be useful in determining what may need to be done, or corrected.
 

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Flush every 2 years max.
But be careful how you do it. Don't push the petal lower than you normally do in braking. That way you keep the thin cup seal away from the crap in the ends of the master cylinders.
A pressure system is better. I have seen too many cars bleas after X years only to have it fail a month later. Nothing like the typical Honda, soft petal ones, then fine feeling to make you think you were imagening things. Then FART! Do the clutch at the same time. Same rules. If you ever boil your brakes, flush.

If you are a racer, I hope you do it as part of the prep every week.
 

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You dont have to bleed it if the pedal fells firm but i would bleed it if there were water and medal shaving found in the sys. U can check this w/ a rag and a magnet.
 

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You dont have to bleed it if the pedal fells firm but i would bleed it if there were water and medal shaving found in the sys. U can check this w/ a rag and a magnet.
You can't "see" water in the system, and I don't think I've ever seen metal shavings. You bleed and flush the brakes for 2 reasons. There is air in the system which gives a soft pedal or sufficient time has elapsed to be concerned about water dissolved in the fluid (glycol ether based brake fluid is hydroscopic and water will dissolve in it, i.e its not visible) which significantly lowers the boiling point and contributes to corrosion in the system. Fluid should be changed about every 2 years. If you are tracking the car, it should be bled every event, otherwise only when indicated by a soft pedal.
 

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You dont have to bleed it if the pedal fells firm but i would bleed it if there were water and medal shaving found in the sys. U can check this w/ a rag and a magnet.
I've never heard of this one before.. Metal shavings in my brake fluid!?!?

Where does that come from? :ugh:
 

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:laughing:

I don't know how many times I bled my brakes this year but I it was more than 5x not because I want to, but because I needed to.
Flush every 2 years max.
But be careful how you do it. Don't push the petal lower than you normally do in braking. That way you keep the thin cup seal away from the crap in the ends of the master cylinders.
A pressure system is better. I have seen too many cars bleas after X years only to have it fail a month later. Nothing like the typical Honda, soft petal ones, then fine feeling to make you think you were imagening things. Then FART! Do the clutch at the same time. Same rules. If you ever boil your brakes, flush.

If you are a racer, I hope you do it as part of the prep every week.
I bled my brakes every year...i dont care if is over kill i got hook up on fluid from acura...$2.58 per bottle..
 
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