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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all - I have a question regarding new paint

Some asshole clipped the rear bumper of my RSX and I just got it back from the shop. From a few angles, the paint on the bumper looks a shade darker than the rest of the car. In addition, if I get real close and compare the metal flake in the paint on the newly painted bumper to the original paint on the side panel, they don't seem to match. It looks like there is more flake in the new paint than the original. Is this normal? I have waxed my car about 15 times in two years, would this by why the shade looks off?

BTW: The color I am referring to is Desert Silver

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
METHINKORANGE said:
mine looked/looks a little off as well, i assumed it just needs some sun.
Normally, I would agree with you that it is the sun but I live in Chicago - we get about 80 sunny days a year (if that).
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
sy0296 said:
color between metal peices and plastic peices will always differ. look at your front bumper and see what i mean...

as for metallic flakes, it's hard to get them to look the same unless you redo your entire car...
Dammit that sucks. I guess once the paint cures in a few months I can wax the hell out of it, maybe that will blend it in more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
After all of this dicussion, I have yet another question.

Acura knows damn well that their cars will be in accidents and that re-painting is unavoidable. In light of this, why can't they distribute the identical paint and painting process to autobody shops so when re-painting is done, it looks like the original? I'm not a car guy but one would think that in this day and age there would be technology available that is advanced enough to perfectly match the original paint on your car.
 

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RSXRollin said:
After all of this dicussion, I have yet another question.

Acura knows damn well that their cars will be in accidents and that re-painting is unavoidable. In light of this, why can't they distribute the identical paint and painting process to autobody shops so when re-painting is done, it looks like the original? I'm not a car guy but one would think that in this day and age there would be technology available that is advanced enough to perfectly match the original paint on your car.
yea, but paint fades. buy new DSM paint, and compare it to your car after it fades a bit. it wont match up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I found this interesting article out on the webabout re-paint, etc...

Most people probably expect to have their paint finish match 100%. Matching today's paint finishes requires experience, training, a good quality paint system, proper equipment, and the right environment. An exact match will depend on many addition factors such the age of the original paint. Most people don't understand exactly what is involved in achieving an acceptable color match.

To start, automobile manufacturers use state of the art facilities costing millions of dollars to produce a show room finish. Next time you are in the show room have a closer look. The equipment, possibly including robots, the environment and the techniques used at the factory can not possibly be reproduced at the Auto Body Shop level. There are hundreds of variables that can affect the match, for this reason most of today's base coat, clear coat metallic colors have to be blended, be it over the fenders or into the doors or what ever adjacent panel. This blending will almost always ensure an acceptable match.

Blending into adjacent panels will not cause any problems if done properly. Usually the majority of the material being applied to those adjacent panels will be clear (urethane). If anything, this will just offer a little more protection. Solid colors are usually more forgiving than metallic colors when it comes to color matching. One of the reasons a metallic color is such a problem is that those tiny flakes of metallic come in different shapes and sizes, their job is to reflect light into different directions. The problem comes in when we are applying our metallics, we can't ensure that they land in the same positions as the ones on the adjacent panel that the manufacturer applied.
 
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