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Master of Vaj
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130 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just recently bought my 02' PWP RSX-S, and I love it! :giggity:

However, after washing it and looking real closely, I noticed a lot of little orange particles in my paint. :thumbsdow It all near the bottom of my vehicle, and there is barely any near the top.

I tried a little bit of 3M rubbing compound and that seems to work, and takes the stuff right off with enough rubbing.

I'm just wondering if anyone else has this issue, and is there a faster way of getting rid of it. It would take me a very long time to get rid of it all by hand.

Please help, thank you!
 

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Man Genuis
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230 Posts
orange peel? Ur car must have been worked on...
 

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Registered
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107 Posts
orange peel? Ur car must have been worked on...
Lol, seriously? Orange peel refers to the smoothness of a paint's finish, and has nothing to do with its color. Especially on newer cars, sometimes the reflection of an object, like a building, tree, etc. in the paint will look jagged and rough around the edges (most noticeable on darker colors); that is, the paint won't show a nice, crisp reflection. The reflection will look rough, like the texture on an orange peel; that's where the term comes from. Anyway, that's orange peel, and is usually fixed by wet sanding, which can be a risky process that many people believe causes premature clear coat failure.

What you're describing (very small orange particles) sounds like oxidation or rail dust. (Rail dust is little bits of iron that embed themselves in your paint, then oxidize/rust, resulting in little orange specks. The name comes from one way the particles are created. Trains running over tracks can cause little flecks of the rail to wear away and become airborne, hence the name "rail dust".) This is more easily seen on lighter colored cars, like your PWP.

A claybar ought to take care of it. I'd recommend the Clay Magic kit, it's usually $10-15 at Autozone.

I'd stop using that rubbing compound ASAP. That's way too harsh of a method. It's like trying to break an egg with a sledgehammer. You may not notice it, but if you look at your car under halogen lights (or in bright sunlight), I'd be willing to bet you've induced a fair amount of swirls into the paint with the rubbing compound. Luckily, swirls are less noticeable on lighter cars.
 

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Master of Vaj
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130 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Lol, seriously? Orange peel refers to the smoothness of a paint's finish, and has nothing to do with its color. Especially on newer cars, sometimes the reflection of an object, like a building, tree, etc. in the paint will look jagged and rough around the edges (most noticeable on darker colors); that is, the paint won't show a nice, crisp reflection. The reflection will look rough, like the texture on an orange peel; that's where the term comes from. Anyway, that's orange peel, and is usually fixed by wet sanding, which can be a risky process that many people believe causes premature clear coat failure.

What you're describing (very small orange particles) sounds like oxidation or rail dust. (Rail dust is little bits of iron that embed themselves in your paint, then oxidize/rust, resulting in little orange specks. The name comes from one way the particles are created. Trains running over tracks can cause little flecks of the rail to wear away and become airborne, hence the name "rail dust".) This is more easily seen on lighter colored cars, like your PWP.

A claybar ought to take care of it. I'd recommend the Clay Magic kit, it's usually $10-15 at Autozone.

I'd stop using that rubbing compound ASAP. That's way too harsh of a method. It's like trying to break an egg with a sledgehammer. You may not notice it, but if you look at your car under halogen lights (or in bright sunlight), I'd be willing to bet you've induced a fair amount of swirls into the paint with the rubbing compound. Luckily, swirls are less noticeable on lighter cars.
Thank you for the wealth of information. :thumbsup: Another reason why I love CRSX
 

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Master of Vaj
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130 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Another quick question. If I use the claybar over my emblems becuse there is rail dust inside there too, will it do any damage to the emblem itself? What about the "i-VTEC DOHC" stickers?

Also what does the claybar do to plastic?

Thanks.
 

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107 Posts
You can clay pretty much anything you want to on the car; wheels, glass, plastic trim (great way to remove overspray from crappy paint jobs); basically you name it. That's why I like claybars so much; they're really quite versatile, and foolproof. As long as you keep the surface lubed, let the clay glide over the paint (or glass, or whatever), check the bar for debris regularly, and wipe down each area with a nice microfiber towel when you're done, you pretty much can't do any harm to your finish.

The clay won't damage the emblems at all; just be sure you keep enough lube on them, so they don't get streaky-looking from the clay residue (even if they do get that way, a quick wash would clear it up). Actually, that's one benefit of debadging the car; it gets rid of the odd nooks and crannies near the badges, so waxing, claying, and polishing become easier. (Plus the lines of the car flow a lot better IMO)

I'm not sure about the stickers; I haven't tried claying over decals before. I imagine they'd be fine though; I'm sure the adhesive that holds them on there is pretty strong stuff, and as long as you aren't forcing the clay bar against the surface, you shouldn't mar or tear the decals themselves; I bet the acrylic or whatever they're made of is pretty durable as well.

Not sure if I mentioned it in here or not, but claying can remove wax from the paint, so if you had a coat of wax on the car, it'd probably be a good idea to re-wax it after you're done claying.

One minor disclaimer: I'm assuming you're using a claybar bought at Autozone/Walmart/etc., as opposed to one bought online. The only reason is that some of the bars you find on detailing supply sites are what's known as a "medium grade" clay (they're all clearly listed as such, so you'd know if you bought one); that means the abrasives in the clay are larger. These are some pretty heavy-duty products; in fact, I'd try to avoid using them; I've seen some pretty badly swirled finishes that were the result of medium-grade clay not being followed up by a finishing polish to remove the swirls. In my opinion, if a normal (fine-grade) claybar won't fix your problem, it's time to polish the car. I'm almost certain it doesn't apply to you, but it's another little tidbit of info that could avoid some problems in the future.
 

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Master of Vaj
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130 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
You can clay pretty much anything you want to on the car; wheels, glass, plastic trim (great way to remove overspray from crappy paint jobs); basically you name it. That's why I like claybars so much; they're really quite versatile, and foolproof. As long as you keep the surface lubed, let the clay glide over the paint (or glass, or whatever), check the bar for debris regularly, and wipe down each area with a nice microfiber towel when you're done, you pretty much can't do any harm to your finish.

The clay won't damage the emblems at all; just be sure you keep enough lube on them, so they don't get streaky-looking from the clay residue (even if they do get that way, a quick wash would clear it up). Actually, that's one benefit of debadging the car; it gets rid of the odd nooks and crannies near the badges, so waxing, claying, and polishing become easier.

I'm not sure about the stickers; I haven't tried claying over decals before. I imagine they'd be fine though; I'm sure the adhesive that holds them on there is pretty strong stuff, and as long as you aren't forcing the clay bar against the surface, you shouldn't mar or tear the decals themselves; I bet the acrylic or whatever they're made of is pretty durable as well.

One minor disclaimer: I'm assuming you're using a claybar bought at Autozone/Walmart/etc., as opposed to one bought online. The only reason is that some of the online bars you find on detailing supply sites are what's known as a "medium grade" clay (they're all clearly listed as such, so you'd know if you bought one); that means the abrasives in the clay are larger. These are some pretty heavy-duty products; in fact, I'd try to avoid using them; I've seen some pretty badly swirled finishes that were the result of medium-grade clay not being followed up by a finishing polish to remove the swirls. In my opinion, if a normal (fine-grade) claybar won't fix your problem, it's time to polish the car. I'm almost certain it doesn't apply to you, but it's another little tidbit of info that could avoid some problems in the future.
I haven't gotten it yet, but I'm planning on it. So Autozone fine-grade claybar = good vs. Medium grade = bad?

Also I should polish the car after doing claybar? Is there anything else? What polish do you recommend.

Thanks again!
 

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Registered
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107 Posts
I haven't gotten it yet, but I'm planning on it. So Autozone fine-grade claybar = good vs. Medium grade = bad?

Also I should polish the car after doing claybar? Is there anything else? What polish do you recommend.

Thanks again!
Yeah, that would be the take-home message. Like I said before, I really like the Clay Magic kit at Autozone.

As far as polishing the car, I want to make sure you understand the difference between polishing and waxing first (if you already know, skip this paragraph). Anyway, polishing a car removes swirls (using a polish and orbital buffer). Waxing just protects the finish from the sun, similar to sunscreen. (Plus it adds a nice gloss, usually)

That being said, if the car has swirls and you (or someone you know) has an orbital buffer...and you've got the ~5-8 hours of free time, I say go for it.
 

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My Autozone does not have a Clay Magic Kit. However, they have this stuff: http://www.autogeek.net/motcalgolcla.html

Mothers Clay Bar Kit, says 80G on there... not sure what that means.

Should be safe to use this, correct?
Yeah, that's fine. Clay Magic supposedly owns the patent for most of the clay on the market anyway. I don't think I've heard of anyone finding a bad claybar kit. The 80g means its an 80 gram bar. You should be able to break it into 2 pieces, and only use one piece. This way, if you drop it or something, you'll still have a usable piece.
 

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Master of Vaj
Joined
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130 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Yeah, that's fine. Clay Magic supposedly owns the patent for most of the clay on the market anyway. I don't think I've heard of anyone finding a bad claybar kit. The 80g means its an 80 gram bar. You should be able to break it into 2 pieces, and only use one piece. This way, if you drop it or something, you'll still have a usable piece.
I can't thank you for all the information. I've never been into keeping my car clean because I owned rust buckets before, but now that I have the REX, I'm doing it every week.
 

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Off That
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236,573 Posts
Being a fellow PWP owner I can tell you that you'll find lots of these regularly... a clay bar will remove them all. Make sure you wax your car afterwards though.

I go over my entire car 3-4 times a year to remove all the spots. One of the benefits of PWP is that the crap on the paint is easy to see :D
 

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ciao-su!
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7,796 Posts
yep, what everyone else said. clay bar it.

i had the same problems and didnt know what to do. (this was before i joined clubrsx). i always used to use old tshirts to wash cars, and i noticed all that crap on my new to me (used) pwp rsx. i tried scrubbing all that shit off with the tshirt & dish wash soap/water mix. it got some out, but i ended up leaving some deep scratches in my paint. i gave up and let it be.

a couple months later, i joined clubrsx and found out about clay bars and OH MY SHIT. it takes all of that stuff off. it was fuckin AMAZING. my white 97 integra had that shit too and i didnt know how to get rid of it. thank you mother fuckin clay bar.
 
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