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You know when you run on the treadmill and there is a setting for "Fat Burn" and one for "Cardio".

Is the fat burn going to make you lose fat faster then the cardio setting? I know the cardio setting is more intense, but what's the difference here in terms of losing weight?
 

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cardio setting will help you lose weight faster assuming you can do it as long as you do the fat burn. The idea of fat burn is that the lower the intensity of the cardio the greater the % of calories you burn comes from fat.
 

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Is the fat burn going to make you lose fat faster then the cardio setting? I know the cardio setting is more intense, but what's the difference here in terms of losing weight?
yes.

if you up the tempo, you'll be using more carbs than fats when burning fuel.

in terms of losing weight, you will lose weight either way. the only difference is that when you up the tempo, some of the calories burned are from carbs. the reason why you breathe harder is because your body is trying to remove lactic acid faster than it will accumulate. this is great when building your VO2 uptake. the more oxygen your body is able to take in, the better you burn fat, since fat is metabolized by things like oxygen.
 

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i think its more for WHAT youre training for? and ruel might school me on this because i might be completely wrong:

but i think ultimately whether your body is using carbs or fat, eventually its just gonna come down to calories as far as losing weight. but a lower setting might be more aerobic where a really high heartrate workout might be on the verge of some anaerobic.

im reading this book all about lactate threshold right now.. its really interesting.

i like to stick in the 70-80% range. i get bored below that :laughing:


edit: and i'll throw out a question. is there a benefit for a "fat burn" workout compared to an "endurance workout" ? maybe it will help save some energy for the next day if you had a race or something?
 

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I was just about to post this thread.. Im glad I looked.

Cause for about 6 months I've been running about 7MPH and putting myself in the 160 Heart rate (Cardio) and often thought if I just jogged and kept my Heart rate at 130ish I'd burn more fat than running.

I havent gotten much fat loss w/ running, and I thought about a long jog. But I could be wrong according to this thread.
 

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I was just about to post this thread.. Im glad I looked.

Cause for about 6 months I've been running about 7MPH and putting myself in the 160 Heart rate (Cardio) and often thought if I just jogged and kept my Heart rate at 130ish I'd burn more fat than running.

I havent gotten much fat loss w/ running, and I thought about a long jog. But I could be wrong according to this thread.
or try doing something else besides running. try doing circuit training at a moderate pace. mix it up with plyometrics. do active recovery too. the key is to keep your body in motion for long periods of time.
 
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edit: and i'll throw out a question. is there a benefit for a "fat burn" workout compared to an "endurance workout" ? maybe it will help save some energy for the next day if you had a race or something?
for your last question, not necessarily. you can easily consume carbs after the run and be fine the next day. it is more common for runners to carb load and there are a few ways to go about doing this.

for your first question, more than anything, a "fat burn" workout will allow you to walk/job for much longer than the cardio workout. this "could" lead to an increase in caloric expenditure...but not then again it may not if you are well trained and can haul ass for a long period of time.

a little physiology: the longer in duration an aerobic workout is, the more fat you will burn simply because CHOs become less and less available as the workout goes on. so, it takes a lonnnng aerobic workout to begin really burning off fat. so...you want to lose weight but would prefer it to be as fat for body comp. reasons.
 

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It's more challenging for your body to oxidize fat when you are running (higher heartrate) than when you are jogging.

Technically the body doesn't begin to break down fat until muscle-glycogen is depleted. Generally the first 15-25 minutes of your workout is glucose then you switch over to fat. Fat burning mode allows you to work out longer so that you are actually burning more calories from fat.

Psychologically it's easier to do intense exercise for shorter periods of time becuase you feel like you are accomplishing more but if your main goal is fat loss longer, lower-intensity aerobic workouts typically yield better results.

Of course increasing VO2 max, lactate threshold, mitochrodial (not sure if I spelled that right) density, and overall endurance/aerobic ability will also help you in your fight to drop weight.

My personal suggestion would be to try interval training. Interval training combines low intensity and high intensity training so that you see improvements in performance as well as weight loss.

I am not an expert on the subject but I have been exercising and helping other people exercise for a few years, these are just my personal observations and and research.

John
 

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What if you're running, and then your body "runs out" of carbs. Will it then proceed to burn fat?
during rest, your body burns all fat. during movement, your body burns carbs and fat. it doesn't run on fat alone. carbs are needed to "prime the pump" for fat useage into the krebs cycle.

this is kind of a good question. if your body were to run out of carbs, it will then turn to protein for energy. this is the reason why you shouldn't workout "too long." if you overtrain, you can lose muscle.

i'll have to go over my exercise physiology notes on this one.
 
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with all that said it usually takes marathon runners into their 20-something mile to start to become carb depleted. it would take a HELL of a weight lifting session...or a shitty diet to become totally carb depleted. but then again marathon runners are highly trained and usually take advantage of crazy carb loading techniques.
 

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with all that said it usually takes marathon runners into their 20-something mile to start to become carb depleted. it would take a HELL of a weight lifting session...or a shitty diet to become totally carb depleted. but then again marathon runners are highly trained and usually take advantage of crazy carb loading techniques.
^yep. it's called "hitting the wall" when you run a marathon where your body completely turns to burning fats for fuel as it runs out of carbs/glycogen/etc...
 

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Yes, it helps, If you set on cardio for fat burning then it's work. But you must have the option on your treadmill for the cardio set if you don't then check this list for the better treadmill.
 

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Think calories as well. You need to burn 3500 calories to burn a pound. If you run for about an hour and burn 500, it would take 7 days to burn a pound. Heres the catch. You can't add energy drinks or recovery plans that are greater than your workout and expect to loose much weight. In fact you build some muscle, eat slightly more due to the workout and you will gain weight. I time my workouts to meals, so when I get hungry I eat normal to kill my appetite and not add calories while still fueling the post workout window. Given an elevated metabolism you can add a few calories, but not as many as gatorade would have you believe.
Just my background. I've race over 1000 bicycle races in the US and Europe, I've run 2 marathons including the one at the end of an Ironman Triathlon and a ton of short ones. I see so many fat triathletes and they all believe they are can eat what ever they want. You run or bike slower, you may only use 3-4 hundred cal per hour--you can't even have frosting on a donut at that rate.
 
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