Acura RSX, ILX and Honda EP3 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I have a 2002 base rsx and was not sure which intake is better. Any suggestions??


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
So I have a 2002 base rsx and was not sure which intake is better. Any suggestions??


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


Get an SRI. I have an AEM & it gives it such a satisfying roar. Plus, theres not a huge diff in performance with an intake. It mainly just helps the engine breathe better


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
#Inkpot
Joined
·
5,137 Posts
If you're not building a serious race car and doing another few thousand dollars in modifications, just get the short one. Feel free to cheap out on ebay crap here. They're all the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
I have an 02 Base as well OP


I've done some research, and as long as you're not driving in a lake I think you're fine

I'll be making my purchase soon, check out the Injen intake
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,065 Posts
Get the SRI so you don’t hydrolock and blow your engine.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
You won't hydrolock with a CAI unless your accelerating through a deep puddle or your filter is fully submerged in water.

Get an SRI. I have an AEM & it gives it such a satisfying roar. Plus, theres not a huge diff in performance with an intake. It mainly just helps the engine breathe better


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
There's a difference of 50 degrees in air temp between cai and sri, at minimum. That's roughly 1% increase in power for every 10 degrees, not to mention you'll get even more heatsoak using an SRI when the vehicle isn't moving. The difference in performance is noticeable. See below for intake comparison on the Type S

https://www.kseriesparts.com/gp/producttests.html

If you're not building a serious race car and doing another few thousand dollars in modifications, just get the short one. Feel free to cheap out on ebay crap here. They're all the same.
You don't need to be building a serious race car to validate purchasing a CAI over an SRI. It's well worth the extra few dollars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
You won't hydrolock with a CAI unless your accelerating through a deep puddle or your filter is fully submerged in water.



There's a difference of 50 degrees in air temp between cai and sri, at minimum. That's roughly 1% increase in power for every 10 degrees, not to mention you'll get even more heatsoak using an SRI when the vehicle isn't moving. The difference in performance is noticeable. See below for intake comparison on the Type S

https://www.kseriesparts.com/gp/producttests.html



You don't need to be building a serious race car to validate purchasing a CAI over an SRI. It's well worth the extra few dollars.


If you live in a dry climate you can get the CAI. I live in Florida which is a tropical climate plus my car is lowered. All it takes is 1 deep puddle and you are shelling out $1,000+ for a new engine. During the summer rain storms I take the Jeep and literally drive around all of the hydrolocked dead vehicles. I would rather have 5 less horsepower and take that $1,000+ I would be spending on a new engine and spend that on mods that make way more than a 5hp difference. A friend of mine worked at a Nissan dealership and he told me how the 370z’s STOCK intake is a CAI and countless 370z’s were coming in with blown engines all the time during rainy season. Water doesn’t compress, and I want absolutely no water anywhere near the inside of my engine. All it takes is one puddle, nobody is going to swerve out of the way to avoid it and potentially hydroplane into another vehicle or a barrier.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Wow. I tried to quote the user “all(less than symbol)dc5” but his username screws this websites code up. I guess you can’t use the “less than symbol!” Anyway, here was my reply:

Exactly my point. Here in Florida people hydrolock their cars left and right during the rainy season. SRI is way safer for a negligible performance difference. When you are actually driving the car there is way more air and cooling than on a dyno. However; if you live somewhere with a dry climate, the CAI would be a safe purchase.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
You won't hydrolock with a CAI unless your accelerating through a deep puddle or your filter is fully submerged in water.



There's a difference of 50 degrees in air temp between cai and sri, at minimum. That's roughly 1% increase in power for every 10 degrees, not to mention you'll get even more heatsoak using an SRI when the vehicle isn't moving. The difference in performance is noticeable. See below for intake comparison on the Type S

https://www.kseriesparts.com/gp/producttests.html



You don't need to be building a serious race car to validate purchasing a CAI over an SRI. It's well worth the extra few dollars.
I concur with everything here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,065 Posts
Wow. I tried to quote the user “all(less than symbol)dc5” but his username screws this websites code up. I guess you can’t use the “less than symbol!” Anyway, here was my reply:

Exactly my point. Here in Florida people hydrolock their cars left and right during the rainy season. SRI is way safer for a negligible performance difference. When you are actually driving the car there is way more air and cooling than on a dyno. However; if you live somewhere with a dry climate, the CAI would be a safe purchase.
that damn internet! ;)


If you live in an area that floods, absolutely get an SRI. The TS didn't say where he lives though.

The difference in performance is not negligible, and that's coming from a guy with an auto tranny. My SRI was right around 120 degrees for daily driving and went as low as 108 on the freeway, and that's with a Hondata intake gasket. I don't think our engine bays really get that much air coming in. There's a lot of shit behind that upper grill.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
that damn internet! ;)





If you live in an area that floods, absolutely get an SRI. The TS didn't say where he lives though.



The difference in performance is not negligible, and that's coming from a guy with an auto tranny. My SRI was right around 120 degrees for daily driving and went as low as 108 on the freeway, and that's with a Hondata intake gasket. I don't think our engine bays really get that much air coming in. There's a lot of shit behind that upper grill.


If you REALLY want cold air, install a water/methanol injection kit ;) A couple cars ago I had a MAZDASPEED3 and I got an AEM water/methanol injection kit used from a friend for $100. I ran straight 100% methanol for additional fueling and I can’t remember exactly but I remember the BATs (boost air temps) being ridiculously ice cold during the Florida summer heat somewhere like 50 degrees!!! Car had an SRI (aka hot air intake.)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
CAI > SRI

Dont be afraid of Hydrolock. I always had CAIs and slammed hondas. Never seized the engine once. People actually claiming it is people who heard stories only. It actually ruins and confuses people. They never actually had the balls to try it out. Ive sped through puddles and went through them slow with no issue I live were it rains and floods all the time weekly
 

·
Waifu Deluxe
Joined
·
745 Posts
I think the CAI hydrolocking issue has a lot to do with your installation and the splash guards being used. I've noticed some aftermarket splashguards are a lot different than oem ones. Also it depends on roads and stuff. I think you'd generally be ok with it but it's going to be rather overkill for a car that's seeing daily use.

For example, I can't think of a single Japanese tuning shop that actually used one on their track cars. If anything they have a whale dick design (no clue what these are actually called lol) but basically they just look like the oem airbox with different piping. The Mugen box is this way as well.

That being said I run an Injen CAI on my car, but I would run a short air intake if it was my ONLY car. I just wouldn't have the benefit vs. cost vs. risk for a car that's not making high HP numbers. So unless you're building a boosted car, or a drag car it's likely very much overkill.

Like I tell everyone, figure out what your end goal with the car is and research from there. You very likely would be better off spending the money elsewhere, and just waiting for a good bargain and good condition used intake comes along. For example Base RSX used to kill it in SCCA Autocross with their classing. Very competitive in stock. So something like that you'd want to just start replacing bushings and replacing worn out parts since the car is 17 years old now. You'll run laps around the competition with just general upkeep repairs and good tires. Most people just throw mods on cars and then make the handling even worse from the factory. Even though the butt dyno says otherwise.
 

·
2002 EBP RSX 5m w/Leather
Joined
·
290 Posts
My suggestion is search. There's more than enough threads asking this exact question over the last 18 years. :deadhorse
Get an SRI. I have an AEM & it gives it such a satisfying roar. Plus, theres not a huge diff in performance with an intake. It mainly just helps the engine breathe better


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
If you're not building a serious race car and doing another few thousand dollars in modifications, just get the short one. Feel free to cheap out on ebay crap here. They're all the same.
I agree with the above. There is no real performance increase on the BASE model. People who say there is are doing further performance mods that will costs thousands, if that’s where you’re headed, then go with CAI, otherwise, a short ram will make your base sound better, (and taking the stock air box out makes some things easier to get to when working on engine).

...See below for intake comparison on the Type S...
Since OP has a base model, the comparison is completely irrelevant, the base has 40 less horsepower and very different VTEC, optimized for economy not performance.

For example, putting a SRI in type S can add about 10 horsepower, and SRI in base may add 2 horsepower.
 

·
#Inkpot
Joined
·
5,137 Posts
You don't need to be building a serious race car to validate purchasing a CAI over an SRI. It's well worth the extra few dollars.
He's putting an intake on a base for the sake of it.

30-60 dollars vs what, like 200-300, for what did you say elsewhere? 1% hp?

K bud.

I made 220 on an unopened 165k mile engine with RBC, RH AND a SRI.

The SRI is fine
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,065 Posts
He's putting an intake on a base for the sake of it.

30-60 dollars vs what, like 200-300, for what did you say elsewhere? 1% hp?

K bud.

I made 220 on an unopened 165k mile engine with RBC, RH AND a SRI.

The SRI is fine
About $150 vs $200 (give or take a few bucks) and 1% for every 10 degrees in temp, bud. That's for cars in general, not just the base or Type S.

My car is by no means fast, but the CAI made a difference on my base. I also have a Hondata gasket though so maybe that's why I notice the difference, idk.

If you're making that kind of power, I'd assume you were tuned as well? Kind of makes the SRI vs CAI argument irrelevant lol
 

·
#Inkpot
Joined
·
5,137 Posts
The point there was being that I made that with an SRI rather than a CAI.

There's no solid reason here to go with a CAI in this case. It costs more and it's more you have to be careful of when it's your DD(big puddles, etc).

Keep grasping at straws though. Your butt dyno saying "it made a big difference" is subjective evidence that doesnt justify the cost alone.

I mean this is obviously pedantic for you now. You just want to be right rather than be helpful. I want to be right too but the difference is that I know I am :rotfl:
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top