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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hopefully I'm not starting a thread that already exist, but how should I be running my suspension for auto x. I'm running on fortune auto 500s with swift springs, a 23mm rear sway bar, OEM front sway. While messing with different settings I saw that stiffening up the rear was beneficial for tight turns, not so much on high speed turning, where it fish tailed at points where I didn't want it to. While stiffening up the front and lowering tire pressure and softening the rear suspsension made it more stable, but slower through tight turns. Any tips and suggestions? TIA
 

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Typically for AutoX, loose is fast. It's harder to drive, because it isn't as stable, but that extra rotation is what makes the car fast. Soft Front, Stiff Rear. Keep in mind the motion ratio on the rear suspension... Spring rates that look crazy stiff on paper aren't really that stiff on the rear of this car. If the car is crazy loose, check rear toe and camber. The more rear toe out you run, the more the car will rotate and will be a lot less stable in high speed sweepers.

What are the spring rates on the Fortunes that you're running? Are they single or double adjustable?
 

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alignment alignment alignment..... Odd are you are running way too little static camber on the nose.

Start tracking tire roll over and tire temps (tire temps is by far the more useful metric here) Its going to tell you what the car is actually doing vs your butt just telling you what the car feels like its doing.

From there we can determine the rest of the setup.
 

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Just curious on what spring rates you are running?

hopefully I'm not starting a thread that already exist, but how should I be running my suspension for auto x. I'm running on fortune auto 500s with swift springs, a 23mm rear sway bar, OEM front sway. While messing with different settings I saw that stiffening up the rear was beneficial for tight turns, not so much on high speed turning, where it fish tailed at points where I didn't want it to. While stiffening up the front and lowering tire pressure and softening the rear suspsension made it more stable, but slower through tight turns. Any tips and suggestions? TIA
 

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Fat Free
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what you're describing sounds right... if you have a setup thats good and rotates well in tight stuff, it'll be nervous for high speed stuff. and the opposite, if you have a stable setup for highspeed turns, it'll be lazy to rotate for slow speed stuff. they key for track driving is to find a setup that works well for both.

Aero can help, then you can have a suspension / alignment setup that leaning more towards good handling for slower turns and the downforce from aero can give you a bit more stability for high speed stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Typically for AutoX, loose is fast. It's harder to drive, because it isn't as stable, but that extra rotation is what makes the car fast. Soft Front, Stiff Rear. Keep in mind the motion ratio on the rear suspension... Spring rates that look crazy stiff on paper aren't really that stiff on the rear of this car. If the car is crazy loose, check rear toe and camber. The more rear toe out you run, the more the car will rotate and will be a lot less stable in high speed sweepers.

What are the spring rates on the Fortunes that you're running? Are they single or double adjustable?
FA 500s with Swift Springs 16k front/20k rear and single
 

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I prefer a car that wants to rotate on its own, but can still be controlled cause of grip. I run my tire pressures low (mostly due to almost nonexistent levels of grip), suspension soft (also due to nonexistent levels of grip), and my dampening settings are right into the first part of the medium spectrum (would run softer dampening but I was having problems with tires rubbing at full lock) and even as well. My car is very neutral on both tight tracks and at speeds of 100 mp/h; although, it can be a bit twitchy depending on surface conditions due to the toe out. That's something you get used to though.

Front alignment is:
2mm (5/64") toe out
-2.5° camber
Caster is fuck of I know.

Rear alignment is:
4mm (5/32") toe out
-1.5° camber

You'll gain better steering response in the slaloms with 0 toe in the front, so if your autocross courses have a lot of slaloms then that's what you want.

If you don't have an LSD, or you have a torsen type LSD, you'd probably benefit from running the suspension soft in the front.
 

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Fat Free
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in my experience rear toe out gave me snap oversteer and reduced my steady state cornering speed... of the 4-5 alignment setups I've tried on the rsx I liked 0 toe front and a very slight toe in rear best
 

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in my experience rear toe out gave me snap oversteer and reduced my steady state cornering speed... of the 4-5 alignment setups I've tried on the rsx I liked 0 toe front and a very slight toe in rear best
The rear doesn't want to step out under braking with toe in?
 

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The rear doesn't want to step out under braking with toe in?
Toe in will help stabilize the rear end under breaking. Toe out will tend to make the car want to snap steer.
 
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