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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I searched but didn't find answer for my question.

Will Swift Sport springs be a more streetable spring than Eibach Pro-Kit?

I'm referring to their off-the-shelf springs, mild upgrade from OEM.

I don't think anyone has them, I'd like to know before I shell out another ~ $300 if they'll be noticeably better than what I have now with the Pro-Kit + Konis.

Up here in Michigan, I literally skate over some of the worst road imperfections with my current setup. Damn disconcerting.

Car's a DD - I don't want to go with coilovers. Ideally I'd like to buy a set of EP3 Bilsteins and modify them for DC5 (as some of you already know) but for now I was thinking of replacing the springs first. Cheaper, and perhaps they are contributing more to the harsh ride than the Konis.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah, I doubt I'd be dissatisfied, but is it worth ditching an almost new set of Pro-Kits?

I mean, just wondering how much of a difference there would be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
http://forums.clubrsx.com/showthread.php?t=519648&highlight=swift

look at my post (#14) for some comments and a few pictures.

I still have them on and they're still great! I haven't had any experience with other springs but I'm satisfied with my purchase. I think my type-r shocks are holding up fine. I've driven through some really shitty roads.
Thanks! :thumbsup:
to me pro kits are such a small difference .. how much of a drop is swift?
Even less than Pro-Kit, (1.0 F/.8R) but Swift claims (and they have some testimonials from some pretty notable racers) that their design and materials are superior to most lowering springs. They're also linear rate, not progressive like Pro-Kit and others.

And, as we know, 1 inch in the front is as low as we want to go with this strut suspension. Living in the Great White North as I do, I don't want to go any lower for clearance reasons. I think the Pro-Kit is actually > 1" drop, I'm approaching slammed!

Of course, the race cars mostly use higher rate Swifts than the off-the-shelf Sport springs, but the design and materials are same or similar.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
http://forums.clubrsx.com/showthread.php?t=519648&highlight=swift

look at my post (#14) for some comments and a few pictures.

I still have them on and they're still great! I haven't had any experience with other springs but I'm satisfied with my purchase. I think my type-r shocks are holding up fine. I've driven through some really shitty roads.
Boy, the front looks really slammed in that frontal shot - maybe a bit lower than my Pro-Kits.....

I don't know where these manufacturers come up with their drop numbers. That's got to be > 1"....
 

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I believe the sport springs are actually progressive. There is some initial body roll coming transitioning into a turn but it is controlled.

The front is pretty low. I have scrapped on some really steep declines (but not often). You just need to approach them at an angle. Suspension travel seems adequate and I haven't hit my bump stops yet.

The drop is probably a little more than 1.5". As the car currently sits, the rear has dropped a little bit. I know because I've had to get the rear camber re-adjusted a couple of times.

In my experience, the ride is comparable to the Mugen SS however the mugen shocks are more aggressively dampened. I suggest getting the type-r shocks for longer shock life. It might be too much over the long run for the type-s.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Why do you think they're progressive?! Swift's website makes all sorts of arguments in favor of linear springs; I don't think there are exceptions to this philosophy in their product lineup. :dontknow:

Are your springs different than the "Sport" springs? You mentioned "Mach" in the name you used - I wonder if they are an even lower spring than the "Sport".

I've never scraped with my Pro-Kits or my H&Rs.....

I'm already on Konis, I'd be keeping them until they rust out and/or blow.
 

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yeah i read that, but what do you mean by skate over imperfections? is the ride too rough or something? just curious. free bump.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
sometimes the springs don't keep up with the pavement.

Since my car's a DD, it's pretty important to me.

Unfortunately, the roads here are in HORRIBLE condition, so it would probably be an issue even with OEM springs.

On the other hand, my wife's '05 (almost) bone stock Corolla handles the roads with more aplomb than my car. Doesn't seem to suffer in the handling department either. Her car does have 17s with 225s, so that helps I'm sure.
 

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off topic, but check this out! i found it off of swift's website:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8A27JXThVE&eurl=http://www.swiftsprings.com/advantage.html

you get to see the dc5 springs and stabilizers (sway bars) in action!


paul, i do have the sport mach springs. They only came out with one lowering spring for the DC5 chassis.

if you look on their product pdf sheet, it says the spring rates are 1.9-3.2 kg/mm for the front and 3.2-8.0 for the rear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
LOL - those rates sure would lead one to think they are progressive springs, wouldn't they!?

Their application sheet - their entire website, AFAICT, doesn't mention "Mach" springs. I thought maybe that was an older line of springs.... :dontknow:
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I emailed Swift - they confirmed that their Sport Springs are indeed progressive rate:

"The linearity in rates write ups is mainly for our Racing Main springs, or Coilover springs.

Why we claim that linear rates are better then progressive rates on a race track, because of consistency.

For any racing, having a spring that is constant in rates will always be far superior then having a part that might act a certain rate and a certain compression of suspension stroke.

Linear rates makes the vehicle handling more predictable and easier for suspension tuners to setup a race car.

Now to your question, what you are looking for is a lowering springs.

Lowering springs that are mainly for street use. Imagine having a linear rate, meaning small bumps or big bumps, you will get the same spring rate.

Is not the best ride quality that you can ask for. That is why alot of people shade away from coilover in the first place on the streets.

They do not want to have the harsh ride on a day to day basis.

We design our lowering springs not only with performance, but with ride comfort in mind.

Therefore, on some of our street application, we would highly preferred using a progressive rating spring to compensate with for example Freeway driving.

As you know, our freeway system is no way in comparison to the smooth surface that you can find on most race tracks.

With a progressive rate, the rate will increase gradually as the springs are being compressed. (Meaning when you corner hard, the car will roll to one side.)

In actuality, you would only need the aggressive rates when you are doing hard driving.

Thanks!"
 

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wow talk about good customer service. that was one hell of a description lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
wow talk about good customer service. that was one hell of a description lol
No doubt!

They've been less responsive to my second question - how do their progressive springs differ/why should I choose their progressive springs ......
 

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paulkramer, I doubt you'll notice too great of difference.

But the fact that they don't lower your car as much is a plus in itself.

There is a limit to how much manufacturers increase lowering spring rates by due to reliability and durability of the stock shock so you should see minimal variance.
 
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