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cult member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Acura Service Manual often calls for torque specs below 20 or even 10 ft/lb. I'm going to replace my VTC Oil Control Valve and the screws need 7.2 ft/lb. How do I do that? I haven't found a torque wrench that goes that low.
 

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Need Help ?
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Converting inch pounds to foot pounds is easy. Just to divide inch pounds by 12. For example 60 inch converted to foot pounds would be 5 foot pounds 60/12=5. Also they make things called Torque screwdriver or the 1/4 inch pounds torque wrenches.
 
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Just do all my torque specs in Newton/meters, now. No converting, it's right there in Helms and every wrench reads them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks guys! I didn't know they made inch/lb torque wrenches. Now I just need to find one under 100$
 

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Gettin F**cked at da Pump
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sears has a 3/8 drive torque wrench that goes that low, I know cuz I bought one a while back. comes with case and all. I would just get the foot pounds.
 

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glory to the hypnotoad
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It is also worth noting that most of those small torque specs simply mean "hey doofus, don't over tighten this", and you don't really need to use a torque wrench -- just don't strip out the fastener. You'd be surprised how few of the items you really need to torque exactly to spec. You will note that most torque specs, when reached, the bolt has just started to exponentially become harder to turn. As you're tuning a bolt, it will spin freely, then start to tighten with a near linear increase in resistance, then as you approach the correct torque, it will start to exponentially increase in resistance. I refer to this as "a tug past snug". The thing to remember, and to acclimate your muscle memory to, is the fact that exponential resistance will be a different amount of resistance depending on the fastener, so pay attention as you are tightening to the force you're using.

When I did my cam install, all I torqued down with a torque wrench were the cam caps, valve lash adjusters, cam gears, and cam sensor wheels. Things that absolutely require accurate torquing are generally things north of 20 lb-ft in areas where bearings are being seated or high tensile load will be exposed such as head studs, cam caps, rod bearings, crank caps. Other areas that expose different metals or metals of different thicknesses to being clamped together should be torqued correctly if at all possible -- but as you may have found out already, this isn't always possible, so it is in your best interest to train your hand to determine when a fastener is torqued correctly by paying attention to the resistance given by the fastener right before your torque wrench clicks.
 

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I just snug the bolts down that are that small, I use the smallest wrench I have layigna round, and snug it up.

I dont know, I dont do it, prob wouldnt hurt, but if this is a bad idea, someone step in and say so. If in doubt put a tiny amount of thread lock on the threads and snug em if you are concerned its not tight enough. Do that so in your mind its good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
yea actually i bought a Micrometer torque wrench, turns out they sell it at Sears or anywhere online (amazon). Works well and since the inception of this thread, i've used it many times after.
 

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glory to the hypnotoad
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How did you do this without throwing off the adjustment? The threaded rod seems to turn every time, so I stick to an open or box end, and a small amount of blue threadlocker.
If it wants to move, I snug the nut a little with an open wrench before torquing. Then it doesn't usually move. If you get a stubborn one, just back off the screw a little before torquing and double check after torquing. I fly through them so fast now that when I run into one of those, I just open it a bit and try again and it usually takes.
 
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